Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • proper noun A surname.
  • proper noun rare A male given name transferred from the surname

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • But as the junior mates were hurrying to execute the order, a pale man, with a bandaged head, arrested them — Radney the chief mate.

    Moby Dick; or the Whale

  • For, spite her leak, and spite of all her other perils, the Town-Ho still maintained her mast-heads, and her captain was just as willing to lower for a fish that moment, as on the day his craft struck the cruising ground; and Radney the mate was quite as ready to change his berth for a boat, and with his bandaged mouth seek to gag in death the vital jaw of the whale.

    Moby Dick; or the Whale

  • Now this Radney, I suppose, was as little of a coward, and as little inclined to any sort of nervous apprehensiveness touching his own person as any fearless, unthinking creature on land or on sea that you can conveniently gentlemen.

    Moby Dick; or the Whale

  • At all events, he had proved so thus far; but Radney was doomed and made mad, and

    Moby Dick; or the Whale

  • In truth, well nigh the whole of this passage being attended by very prosperous breezes, the Town-Ho had all but certainly arrived in perfect safety at her port without the occurrence of the least fatality, had it not been for the brutal overbearing of Radney, the mate, a Vineyarder, and the bitterly provoked vengeance of Steelkilt, a Lakeman and desperado from

    Moby Dick; or the Whale

  • But Radney, the mate, was ugly as a mule; yet as hardy, as stubborn, as malicious.

    Moby Dick; or the Whale

  • Now what cozening fiend it was, gentlemen, that possessed Radney to meddle with such a man in that corporeally exasperated state, I know not; but so it happened.

    Moby Dick; or the Whale

  • And for Radney, though in his infancy he may have laid him down on the lone Nantucket beach, to nurse at his maternal sea; though in after life he had long followed our austere Atlantic and your contemplative Pacific; yet was he quite as vengeful and full of social quarrel as the backwoods seaman, fresh from the latitudes of buckhorn handled Bowie-knives.

    Moby Dick; or the Whale

  • After a stiff pull, their harpooneer got fast, and, spear in hand, Radney sprang to the bow.

    Moby Dick; or the Whale

  • The mutineer was the bowsman of the mate, and when fast to a fish, it was his duty to sit next him, while Radney stood up with his lance in the prow, and haul in or slacken the line, at the word of command.

    Moby Dick: or, the White Whale

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