Randall Jarrell love

Randall Jarrell

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  • Among my favorites is "Randall Jarrell," one of the many Lowell wrote in the form of the blank verse sonnet during the 1960s and early 1970s.

    PoetryFoundation.org

  • However, despite the red-baiting of the 1950s and the relentless jabs of critics such as Randall Jarrell — who wrote in 1953, “if my reader will get as woolly-headed and as oracularly emotional as he can ... he will get the raw material of one of Miss Rukeyser’s elegies” — Rukeyser never succumbed to political pressures.

    Muriel Rukeyser.

  • Another poem I liked to think about during the bad days was “Hope,” by the American poet Randall Jarrell 1914–1965.

    In the Valley of the Shadow

  • Another poem I liked to think about during the bad days was “Hope,” by the American poet Randall Jarrell 1914–1965.

    In the Valley of the Shadow

  • With the odd honorable exception--Antony Gormley's Angel of the North, for example--most contemporary public sculpture prompts the viewer to echo the question posed fifty years ago by Randall Jarrell in Pictures from an Institution: well, it's ugly, but is it Art?

    Geoff Dyer: What Will Survive of Us?

  • Another poem I liked to think about during the bad days was “Hope,” by the American poet Randall Jarrell 1914–1965.

    In the Valley of the Shadow

  • Another poem I liked to think about during the bad days was “Hope,” by the American poet Randall Jarrell 1914–1965.

    In the Valley of the Shadow

  • In Randall Jarrell's curt judgment: "Wilbur never goes too far, but he never goes far enough."

    A Great Living Poet's Rare Art of Reticence

  • What marks Stead's novel out is the intensity of her savage, visceral depiction of family life; her knowledge of its enchantments and its confounding elasticity – even Henny experiences "absences of hatred, aimless lulls that all long wars must have" – and, as the poet Randall Jarrell observed in a preface commended by both Franzen and Carter, its outrageous, "immoderate" oddity.

    The Man Who Loved Children – review

  • Randall Jarrell's working definition of the novel as "a prose narrative of some length that has something wrong with it" has, in this voluminous work, been ruled out of bounds.

    What Killed American Lit.

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