Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • proper n. A long, narrow sea between Africa and the Arabian peninsula; links the Suez Canal with the Arabian Sea.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. a long arm of the Indian Ocean between northeast Africa and Arabia; linked to the Mediterranean at the north end by the Suez Canal

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • The British soldiers nicknamed the Hadendowa of the Red Sea hills “Fuzzy-Wuzzies” for their hairstyles.

    Three Empires on the Nile

  • Understood in this latter sense, the Red Sea stretches from the Strait of Babel-Mandeb, in lat.

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 12: Philip II-Reuss

  • Caravans then walked three hundred miles to the Red Sea ports of Suakin and Massowa, where they were shipped across the Red Sea to the giant Arabian slave market at Jeddah.

    Three Empires on the Nile

  • Baring had not asked to advance up the Nile, only to expand the British foothold on the Red Sea coast by fifty miles, and secure Tokar.

    Three Empires on the Nile

  • The revolution is not complete yet, said demonstrator Wael Malak, who temporarily closed his shop in the Egyptian Red Sea resort of Sharm el-Sheik because the political turmoil led to a sharp drop in tourism.

    Egyptians rally, demand trials for police shooters

  • Back in February 1885, as the Egyptian garrison had withdrawn from the Red Sea port of Massowa, Gladstone had frustrated a suspected French intention to annex the port by inviting Italy to take it over until Egypt could recover it.

    Three Empires on the Nile

  • The traditional identification of the Gulf of Suez with the Red Sea crossed by Israel should therefore not be given up.

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 12: Philip II-Reuss

  • With merchant traffic through the Gulf of Suez and down the Red Sea around Arabia, it could also serve as an end point for trade from Persia and India.

    Alexander the Great

  • In I Cor., x, 2, the passage of the Red Sea is referred to as a fitting type of Christian baptism.

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 12: Philip II-Reuss

  • The passage of the Red Sea was ever, and indeed rightly, considered by the Hebrews as a most important event in their national history, and also as one of the most wonderful miracles of the Almighty in behalf of His Chosen People.

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 12: Philip II-Reuss

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