Definitions

Sorry, no definitions found. You may find more data at roger sherman.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Anyone who's fascinated by the restaurant industry, entrepreneurs, New York, architecture, business strategy or documentaries i.e., everyone should watch the DVD of filmmaker Roger Sherman's "The Restaurateur," pronto.

    Bits & Bites: News You Can Eat

  • The café sits on the site of the home of the organization's namesake Roger Sherman, New Haven's first mayor, whose name appears on the Declaration of Independence, the Articles of Confederation and the U.S. Constitution.

    An Antitax Crusade

  • In the early afternoon, Post Tech will moderate a panel on net neutrality with FCC chief of staff Eddie Lazarus, AT&T executive vice president Jim Cicconi, Verizon executive vice president Tom Tauke, Google media counsel Rick Whitt and Neil Fried (R) and Roger Sherman (D), staffers for the House Energy and Commerce Committee.

    CES: Feds, lobbyists discuss policy issues at tech industry show

  • Roger Sherman of Connecticut suggested that because the Constitution did not give the federal government the power to infringe upon fundamental rights, a bill of rights was unnecessary.

    John W. Whitehead: Constitution Day: Celebrate the Bill of Rights

  • Thanks to Roger Sherman, they were at least grouped together—but at the end of the Constitution, like the afterthought they were, not at its beginning, as with most state declarations of rights.

    Ratification

  • The others were John Adams, Benjamin Franklin, Roger Sherman of Connecticut and Robert Livingston of New York, who was not an advocate of independence.

    Kenneth C. Davis: Don't Know Much About the Declaration? A Refresher On Our Freedoms

  • The others were John Adams, Benjamin Franklin, Roger Sherman of Connecticut and Robert Livingston of New York, who was not an advocate of independence.

    Kenneth C. Davis: Don't Know Much About the Declaration? A Refresher On Our Freedoms

  • Dorothy Kalins, the founder of Saveur magazine, and her husband, Roger Sherman, a documentary filmmaker, fell in love with the pickles that they bought from a farmstand near their summer house at the eastern tip of Long Island.

    One Big Table

  • Roger Sherman, however, attacked several essays critical of the Constitution that had not appeared in the Connecticut press, including those signed “Centinel,” “Cato,” “An Old Whig,” and “Brutus.”

    Ratification

  • The son of a Massachusetts farmer, Roger Sherman was at first a shoemaker, and then, after moving to Milford, Connecticut, in 1743, he became the surveyor of Litchfield County, a lawyer, and soon a judge.

    Ratification

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.