Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • Greek lyric poet whose work, noted for its passionate and erotic celebration of the beauty of young women and men, survives only in fragments.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun A humming-bird with a long forked tail, Sappho sparganura.
  • noun [capitalized] A genus of such Trochilidæ; the comets. See comet, 3.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun (Zoöl.) Any one of several species of brilliant South American humming birds of the genus Sappho, having very bright-colored and deeply forked tails; -- called also firetail.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • proper noun A taxonomic genus within the family Trochilidae.
  • proper noun An Ancient Greek female name, particularly borne by a poetess from Lesbos who lived between 630 and 570 BC (exact dates unknown).

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun the Greek lyric poet of Lesbos; much admired although only fragments of her poetry have been preserved (6th century BC)

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Ancient Greek Σαπφώ (Sapphō).

Examples

  • Watching a play by Euripides or reading poetry by Sappho is perhaps as incomplete an experience today as watching a "play" by Wagner or reading "poetry" by Stephen Sondheim would be

    Tragic Heroes

  • Robinson writes of the ill-fated romance in Sappho and Phaon, casting Sappho as the supreme example of the heightened sensibility that is born with poetic genius, and attributing her amoral reputation to the envy of little minds.

    Editorial Notes to 'Letter to the Women of England'

  • Robinson become the "avatar" of Sappho, but she also makes the point in Sappho and Phaon that it is poets like themselves, and not polemicists like Wollstonecraft, who have

    Editorial Notes to 'Letter to the Women of England'

  • Sappho is neither sexually loose, as Gainsborough's chemise suggests, nor sexually innocent.

    Framing Romantic Dress: Mary Robinson, Princess Caroline and the Sex/Text

  • Watching a play by Euripides or reading poetry by Sappho is perhaps as incomplete an experience today as watching a "play" by Wagner or reading "poetry" by Stephen Sondheim would be

    Notes from Antiquity

  • This has an unsettling if little-recognized implication: watching a play by Euripides or reading poetry by Sappho is perhaps as incomplete an experience today as watching a "play" by Wagner or reading "poetry" by Stephen Sondheim would be.

    Notes from Antiquity

  • Watching a play by Euripides or reading poetry by Sappho is perhaps as incomplete an experience today as watching a "play" by Wagner or reading "poetry" by Stephen Sondheim would be

    Notes from Antiquity

  • This has an unsettling if little-recognized implication: watching a play by Euripides or reading poetry by Sappho is perhaps as incomplete an experience today as watching a "play" by Wagner or reading "poetry" by Stephen Sondheim would be.

    Notes from Antiquity

  • The name of the Grecian poetess, Sappho, is probably known to almost every reader.

    Letter to the Women of England, on the Injustice of Mental Subordination

  • The name of the Grecian poetess, Sappho, is probably known to almost every reader.

    Letter to the Women of England, on the Injustice of Mental Subordination

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