Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Archaic form of Slav.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Sglau or Sglou; the Arabians adopted the expression Sclav, but because it could not be brought into harmony with their phonetical laws they changed it into Saklab, Sakalib, and later also to Slavije,

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 14: Simony-Tournon

  • Next in the count came Dal the Fat and Duk the Sclav; Wisna, a woman, filled with sternness, and

    The Danish History, Books I-IX

  • The Poles (the Polacks of Shakespeare), are a branch of the Sclav race, their language differing but little from that of the Russians,

    Russia As Seen and Described by Famous Writers

  • The Russian people, composed of diverse elements in which the Sclav predominated at the moment when that vast empire began to be established under great princes and amid incessant struggle, was in too close communication with Byzantium not to have been to a certain extent in submission to Byzantine art; but nevertheless each of these elements was in possession of certain notions of art which we must not neglect.

    Russia As Seen and Described by Famous Writers

  • But it should be remembered that Sclav and Tartar were not in former times so far asunder in manners, in language, in polish, nor so free from admixture in blood as the Russians fondly believe.

    Russia As Seen and Described by Famous Writers

  • Contact and co-operation with Western civilization, and escape from Tartar subjugation, permitted the Poles to work out their own development on lines so widely apart from those pursued by their Russian brethren, that the complete amalgamation of these two great Sclav branches has long been a matter of practical impossibility.

    Russia As Seen and Described by Famous Writers

  • Even in Byzantine art, so far as ornamentation is concerned, there were origins that were evidently common to those that are felt in the Sclav arts; and these original elements are again found in

    Russia As Seen and Described by Famous Writers

  • Sclav was sufficiently advanced musically to imbibe a new idea.

    Russia As Seen and Described by Famous Writers

  • "Where there is a Sclav there is a Song," says a Sclavonic proverb, and no public ceremony or Court function is ever deemed complete in Russia without an outburst of singing to heighten its impressiveness.

    Russia As Seen and Described by Famous Writers

  • By attacking us in India, which they possibly do not desire to conquer, the Panslavists and Russian enthusiasts believe they would establish their empire at Constantinople, and unite the whole Sclav race under the dominion of the Tsar.

    Russia As Seen and Described by Famous Writers

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