Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • proper noun A taxonomic genus within the family Scombridae — the mackerels.

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

Latin scomber ("mackerel"), from Ancient Greek σκόμβρος (skombros).

Examples

  • Mackerel (Scomber scombrus) and blue whiting (Micromesistius poutassou) are likely to migrate northeast to the Barents Sea.

    Future change in processes and impacts on Arctic biota

  • Hunter et al. [22], working with northern anchovy (Engraulis mordax) and Pacific mackerel (Scomber japonicus) embryos and larvae, reported that exposure to surface levels of UV-B radiation could be lethal.

    Effects of changes in ultraviolet radiation in the Arctic

  • “Warm water” pelagic species, such as blue whiting (Micromesistius poutassou) and mackerel (Scomber scombrus), are likely to occur in the area in higher concentrations and more regularly than in the past.

    Fisheries and aquaculture in the Northeast Atlantic (Barents and Norwegian Seas)

  • For information about the pelagic species Scomber japonicus and its predator/prey interactions with other stocks and with zooplankton (copepoda and mysidacea), see Gonzalez and Bas (1989).

    Canary Current large marine ecosystem

  • Scombroid Poisoning Scombroid poisoning is unusual in that it is caused by a number of otherwise harmless microbes when they grow on insufficiently chilled mackerels of the genus Scomber and other similarly active swimmers, including tuna, mahimahi, bluefish, herring, sardine, and anchovy.

    On Food and Cooking, The Science and Lore of the Kitchen

  • The famous pickle Garum was made from the Thynnus or Tunny as well as from the Scomber, but that from the Scomber was counted the most delicate.

    Travels through France and Italy

  • Those who would be further informed about the Garum and the Scomber may consult Caelius Apicius de recogninaria, cum notis, variorum.

    Travels through France and Italy

  • Scombroid Poisoning Scombroid poisoning is unusual in that it is caused by a number of otherwise harmless microbes when they grow on insufficiently chilled mackerels of the genus Scomber and other similarly active swimmers, including tuna, mahimahi, bluefish, herring, sardine, and anchovy.

    On Food and Cooking, The Science and Lore of the Kitchen

  • (_Scomber scomber_) gives the best sport to a bait, usually a strip of fish skin, trailed behind a boat fairly close to the surface, but it will sometimes feed on the bottom.

    Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 2, Part 1, Slice 1

  • There was the mill in which they ground the mackerel, and the trough to hold it, and the long-handled dipper to cast it overboard with; and already in the harbor we saw the surface rippled with schools of small mackerel, the real Scomber vernalis.

    Cape Cod

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.