Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun Plural form of Scotchwoman.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • The progress of Mrs Kilbannon and Miss Christie Cameron up the river to Montreal, and so west to Elgin, was one series of surprises, most of them pleasant and instructive to such a pair of intelligent Scotchwomen, if we leave out the number of Roman Catholic churches that lift their special symbol along the banks of the St Lawrence and the fact that Hugh

    The Imperialist

  • The concern originated in a small shop, where, some fifty years ago, a Scotchwomen sold candy, with her two boys as clerks.

    The Continental Monthly, Vol. 2, No. 2, August, 1862 Devoted to Literature and National Policy

  • Dandy and the Fizzer were converted; and Jack having realised that there are such things as Scotchwomen -- Scotch-hearted women -- a new bond was established between us.

    We of the Never-Never

  • "When you are grown up, and able to prepare a speech," said he, "you must go down to Albany and talk to the legislators; tell them all you have seen in this office – the sufferings of these Scotchwomen, robbed of their inheritance and left dependent on their unworthy sons, and, if you can persuade them to pass new laws, the old ones will be a dead letter."

    Eighty Years and More: Reminiscences 1815-1897

  • The voice had a plaintive tone in it, as so many voices of Scotchwomen have.

    Kirsteen: The Story of a Scotch Family Seventy Years Ago

  • These two were Scotchwomen by birth, and both were widows.

    The Lock and Key Library Classic Mystery and Detective Stories: Modern English

  • --- And which of these two pretty Scotchwomen, whom you insisted upon my admiring, is the distinguished fair?

    The Waverley

  • The Jamiesons were doing well, and in turn going for a visit to their native country, had brought out two bright young Scotchwomen as their wives.

    On the Pampas

  • His sisters, who, taking after their mother, were all true Scotchwomen, now urged upon him to comply with Archie's request and accompany him to Lanark.

    In Freedom's Cause : a Story of Wallace and Bruce

  • "When you are grown up, and able to prepare a speech," said he, "you must go down to Albany and talk to the legislators; tell them all you have seen in this office -- the sufferings of these Scotchwomen, robbed of their inheritance and left dependent on their unworthy sons, and, if you can persuade them to pass new laws, the old ones will be a dead letter."

    Eighty Years and More; Reminiscences 1815-1897

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