Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • proper n. A set of laws in Ancient Greece that cancelled existing debts, ended debt-related slavery, and returned confiscated serf property.

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

Ancient Greek σεισάχθεια, from σείειν "to shake" and ἄχθος "burden", i.e. the relief of burdens.

Examples

  • This measure is commonly called the Seisachtheia [= removal of burdens], since thereby the people had their loads removed from them.

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  • Seisachtheia is one of many ways in which lending was regulated in ancient cultures.

    Dr. Behzad Mohit: Greece: Is It the First Domino to Fall?

  • ” His Seisachtheia (“shaking-off-of-burdens”) canceled all debts on land, banned debt slavery, and freed all debt slaves.

    d. Athens

  • It so happened that, when he was about to enact the Seisachtheia, he communicated his intention to some members of the upper class, whereupon, as the partisans of the popular party say, his friends stole a march on him; while those who wish to attack his character maintain that he too had a share in the fraud himself.

    THE ATHENIAN CONSTITUTION

  • Once more he speaks of the abolition of debts and of those who before were in servitude, but were released owing to the Seisachtheia:

    THE ATHENIAN CONSTITUTION

  • Seisachtheia [= removal of burdens], since thereby the people had their loads removed from them.

    The Athenian Constitution

  • _Seisachtheia_, or shaking off of burdens, was directed.

    The Great Events by Famous Historians, Volume 01

  • The Seisachtheia must have exasperated the feelings and diminished the fortunes of many persons; but it gave to the large body of Thetes and small proprietors all that they could possibly have hoped.

    The Great Events by Famous Historians, Volume 01

  • In regard to the whole measure of the Seisachtheia, indeed, though the poems of Solon were open to every one, ancient authors gave different statements both of its purport and of its extent.

    The Great Events by Famous Historians, Volume 01

  • Seisachtheia cannot be acquitted of injustice, we may confidently affirm that the injustice inflicted was an indispensable price paid for the maintenance of the peace of society, and for the final abrogation of a disastrous system as regarded insolvents.

    The Great Events by Famous Historians, Volume 01

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