Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • proper noun historical A set of laws in Ancient Greece that cancelled existing debts, ended debt-related slavery, and returned confiscated serf property.

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

Ancient Greek σεισάχθεια, from σείειν "to shake" and ἄχθος "burden", i.e. the relief of burdens.

Examples

  • This measure is commonly called the Seisachtheia [= removal of burdens], since thereby the people had their loads removed from them.

    The Athenian Constitution

  • This measure is commonly called the Seisachtheia [= removal of burdens], since thereby the people had their loads removed from them.

    The Athenian Constitution

  • This measure is commonly called the Seisachtheia [= removal of burdens], since thereby the people had their loads removed from them.

    THE ATHENIAN CONSTITUTION

  • This measure is commonly called the Seisachtheia [= removal of burdens], since thereby the people had their loads removed from them.

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  • Seisachtheia is one of many ways in which lending was regulated in ancient cultures.

    Dr. Behzad Mohit: Greece: Is It the First Domino to Fall?

  • It so happened that, when he was about to enact the Seisachtheia, he communicated his intention to some members of the upper class, whereupon, as the partisans of the popular party say, his friends stole a march on him; while those who wish to attack his character maintain that he too had a share in the fraud himself.

    The Athenian Constitution

  • It so happened that, when he was about to enact the Seisachtheia, he communicated his intention to some members of the upper class, whereupon, as the partisans of the popular party say, his friends stole a march on him; while those who wish to attack his character maintain that he too had a share in the fraud himself.

    The Athenian Constitution

  • ” His Seisachtheia (“shaking-off-of-burdens”) canceled all debts on land, banned debt slavery, and freed all debt slaves.

    d. Athens

  • It so happened that, when he was about to enact the Seisachtheia, he communicated his intention to some members of the upper class, whereupon, as the partisans of the popular party say, his friends stole a march on him; while those who wish to attack his character maintain that he too had a share in the fraud himself.

    THE ATHENIAN CONSTITUTION

  • Once more he speaks of the abolition of debts and of those who before were in servitude, but were released owing to the Seisachtheia:

    THE ATHENIAN CONSTITUTION

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