Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • An ancient city of Mesopotamia on the Tigris River south-southeast of modern Baghdad. Founded c. 300 BC, it was an important commercial center and the chief city of the empire founded by Seleucus I.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • proper noun the name of a number of cities founded by kings of the Seleucid dynasty, the most famous being Seleucia on the Tigris

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Ancient Greek Σελεύκεια (Seleukeia).

Examples

  • Thus, one of Alexander's youngest generals, afterwards Seleucus I, sometimes styled Nicator, founded several towns called Seleucia, at least three called Apamea, and others named Laodicea and Antiochia, thereby recording himself, his

    Ancient Town-Planning

  • This district is rich and well cultivated: not far off is Coche, which is also called Seleucia; where we fortified a camp with great celerity, and rested there two days to refresh the army with timely supplies of water and provisions.

    The Roman History of Ammianus Marcellinus During the Reigns of the Emperors Constantius, Julian, Jovianus, Valentinian, and Valens

  • Silk, Palmyra's prized commodity, began its westward journey at the Indian port of Barbaricon, passing by boat to Seleucia and Babylon, before traveling by caravan to Palmyra, and then on to the Mediterranean coast.

    Temple of the 'Bride of the Desert'

  • The two of them, sent on their way by the Holy Spirit, went down to Seleucia and sailed from there to Cyprus.

    How new missionaries choose their country of service: do we need a change?

  • It reached the court of the Parthian king at the city of Seleucia, near modern Baghdad.

    The Spartacus War

  • It reached the court of the Parthian king at the city of Seleucia, near modern Baghdad.

    The Spartacus War

  • It reached the court of the Parthian king at the city of Seleucia, near modern Baghdad.

    The Spartacus War

  • It reached the court of the Parthian king at the city of Seleucia, near modern Baghdad.

    The Spartacus War

  • Rimini and of Seleucia, consisting of six hundred bishops, with a prodigious number of priests.

    A Philosophical Dictionary

  • After the first Council of Nice, composed of three hundred and seventeen infallible bishops, another council was held at Rimini; on which occasion the number of the infallible was four hundred, without reckoning a strong detachment, at Seleucia, of about two hundred.

    A Philosophical Dictionary

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