Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • A town of northern Italy northwest of Milan. In July, 1976, a ruptured valve at a chemical plant here released a cloud of dioxin, injuring many people.

Etymologies

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Examples

  • These lands, known as Seveso sites, are currently owned by Topaz Energy, the National Oil Reserve Agency and Gouldings Fertilisers.

    An Irish Town Planner's Blog

  • Fears about dioxin, which is actually a generic name for a series of chemicals of widely different potency, were triggered by another cloud, one that formed over Seveso in Italy in 1976 after the safety system in a chemical plant failed.

    Not-So-Risky Business

  • It turned out, however, that none of the aborted babies or children born to women pregnant during the Seveso disaster had any malformations or other major health problems.

    Not-So-Risky Business

  • It's the same around Seveso in Italy, contaminated with dioxins from a notorious accident in the 1970s, and among Russian pesticide workers.

    Christopher Gavigan: Chemicals In Everyday Products Turning Boys Into Girls?

  • People who were accidentally exposed to 2,3,7,8-TCDD in Seveso, Italy, or Times Beach, Missouri, were probably exposed through eating and drinking contaminated food and milk, breathing contaminated particles and dust, and through skin contact with contaminated soil.

    Public Health Statement for Chlorinated Dibenzo-p-dioxins (CDDs)

  • Franca Rame continues with "Parti femminili" and participates in a production for RAI 2, "Una lepre con la faccia da bambina", a film by Gianni Sera on the ecological disaster in Seveso.

    Dario Fo - Biography

  • One category of information they examined came from episodes of known or suspected human contact with 2,4,5-T and dioxin, such as one that occurred after a chemical plant accident at Seveso, Italy, in 1976.

    Operation Ranch Hand

  • On Saturday, July 10, 1976, the citizens of Seveso, Italy, were startled by a sudden loud whistling sound coming from the direction of the nearby Icmesa chemical factory.

    The Full Feed from HuffingtonPost.com

  • It was ten days before the people of Seveso learned that the white dust contained dioxin, a deadly poison far more dangerous than arsenic or strychnine.

    The Full Feed from HuffingtonPost.com

  • Fears about dioxin, which is actually a generic name for a series of chemicals of widely different potency, were triggered by another cloud, one that formed over Seveso in Italy in

    Forbes.com: News

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