Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Plural form of Sicilian.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • 'Besides, the Goldonis aren't Sicilians, which is more than I can say for my husband.

    The Kaisho

  • Constant communion with death makes for callosity of feeling; and the Calabrians and the Sicilians are the cruellest among the civilized peoples.

    The Place of Honeymoons

  • The Greeks, the Syrians, the Dalmatians, the Italians, and the Sicilians are the people who will use the canal, if anybody uses it.

    Correspondence & Conversations of Alexis de Tocqueville with Nassau William Senior from 1834 to 1859, Volume 2

  • Being a pretty common story, however -- for the Sicilians are a hot-blooded race -- it was quite easy for the authorities to reconstruct the scene; and since Tochatti was innocent of any actual crime she was eventually released; only to fall ill with some affection of the brain which finally landed her in an asylum. "

    Afterwards

  • Some Negroes live harmoniously in the same tenements with Sicilians.

    A Renegade History of the United States

  • Edward Ross, professor of sociology at the University of Wisconsin and president of the American Sociological Association, argued in a 1914 book that because there was “no small infusion of Greek, Saracen, and African blood in the Calabrians and Sicilians,” they had reached only “a primitive stage of civilization.”

    A Renegade History of the United States

  • The creators of that music were descendants of slaves like Joe “King” Oliver, Ferdinand “Jelly Roll” Morton, and Louis Armstrong, and men who had been the half-naked children of the old, dark, fat Sicilians of Little Palermo.

    A Renegade History of the United States

  • Three years later, the commission reported, friendly relations exist between the Sicilians, who predominate on the Near North Side and their Negro neighbors.

    A Renegade History of the United States

  • After years of speaking only for “Italians” and “Sicilians,” Giambastiani now represented “the white people of St. Philip” against “the newly come Negroes.”

    A Renegade History of the United States

  • Most of these “surly Sicilians” headed to the “Little Palermo” section of the French Quarter.

    A Renegade History of the United States

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