Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • proper n. Ancient Greek lyric poet from the island of Ceos.

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Ancient Greek Σιμωνίδης (Simōnidēs).

Examples

  • ” He was well liked by the common people, would salute every particular citizen by his own name, and always show himself a just judge in questions of business between private men; he said to Simonides, the poet of Ceos, who desired something of him, when he was commander of the army, that was not reasonable, “Simonides, you would be no good poet if you wrote false measure, nor should I be a good magistrate if for favor I made false law.

    Themistocles

  • Again Panek began thinking, though very sketchily, about "Sime", as he called Simonides, and the "plot" that was being hatched there.

    Man of Many Minds

  • Yes, Simonides, that is so far true; a small percentage of them no doubt will, and this scant moiety will be sold at so high a price to the despotic monarch, that the exhibitor of the merest trifle looks to receive from the imperial pocket, within the briefest interval, ten times more than he can hope to win from all the rest of mankind in a lifetime; and then he will be off. 22

    Hiero

  • The one in Antioch was in charge of a man said by some to have been a family servant called Simonides, Greek in name, yet an Israelite.

    Ben-Hur, a tale of the Christ

  • Yes, Simonides, that is so far true; a small percentage of them no doubt will, and this scant moiety will be sold at so high a price to the despotic monarch, that the exhibitor of the merest trifle looks to receive from the imperial pocket, within the briefest interval, ten times more than he can hope to win from all the rest of mankind in a lifetime; and then he will be off.

    Hiero

  • The banquet shone joyously with its cups; the house resounded with gladness, amid vast preparations, when, on a sudden, two young men, covered with dust, and dripping with perspiration, their bodies of more than human form, requested one of the servants to call Simonides to them, {and say} that it was of consequence to him to make no delay.

    The Fables of Phædrus Literally translated into English prose with notes

  • People one town with Epicureans such as Simonides, Protagoras, Des Barreux,

    A Philosophical Dictionary

  • Thus it happens that the remains of the Greek lyric poets, especially the later, such as Simonides and Bacchylides, are principally of a deeply moral cast.

    The Modern Scottish Minstrel, Volume III The Songs of Scotland of the Past Half Century

  • "Simonides," Ben-Hur answered, much moved, "the holy peace you tender is accepted.

    Ben-Hur, a tale of the Christ

  • His idea went back to the Greek poet Simonides, who, one day while visiting friends at a palace, stepped outside for a minute to see who was at the door.

    The Memory Palace

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