Definitions

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun (Arthurian legend) the most virtuous knight of the Round Table; was able to see the Holy Grail

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • A most noble benignity and purity reposed in the countenance of him they called Sir Galahad, and likewise in the king's also; and there was majesty and greatness in the giant frame and high bearing of Sir Launcelot of the Lake.

    A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court

  • A most noble benignity and purity reposed in the countenance of him they called Sir Galahad, and likewise in the king's also; and there was majesty and greatness in the giant frame and high bearing of Sir Launcelot of the Lake.

    A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court, Part 1.

  • A most noble benignity and purity reposed in the countenance of him they called Sir Galahad, and likewise in the king's also; and there was majesty and greatness in the giant frame and high bearing of Sir Launcelot of the Lake.

    A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court

  • Mass, and had done, anon he called Sir Galahad, and said unto him,

    Character Sketches of Romance, Fiction and the Drama A Revised American Edition of the Reader's Handbook, Vol. 3

  • Galahad received the crown, he got up early, and, with his fellows, came to where the holy vessel was; and they saw one kneeling before it that had about him a great fellowship of angels; and he called Sir Galahad, and said, "Come, thou servant of the Lord, and thou shalt see what thou hast much desired to see."

    The Age of Fable

  • Galahad received the crown, he got up early, and, with his fellows, came to where the holy vessel was; and they saw one kneeling before it that had about him a great fellowship of angels; and he called Sir Galahad, and said, "Come, thou servant of the Lord, and thou shalt see what thou hast much desired to see."

    The Age of Chivalry

  • Christmas Mystery, "beside Tennyson's" Sir Galahad, "the difference is striking.

    A History of English Romanticism in the Nineteenth Century

  • The 3rd graders rallied to Sir Galahad, and Mrs. T was reduced to her cats.

    the staR

  • Or, they can be like the sleep-deprived residents you get in the middle of the night when Mrs. Sundowner has gone completely kazoo, has wrapped her large can of protein supplement powder in her belt and is swinging it over her head like Sir Galahad using a mace.

    Help Wanted: Psychiatrist

  • Sir Bors, in fact, is best known—when he is known at all—as a chaste knight who only had sex once in his life (some would say this qualifies him as a “bore,” but his adventures speak otherwise) and who—along with Sir Galahad and Sir Perceval—was one of the successful grail knights (considering the number of knights King Arthur had, this is a pretty big deal).

    Archive 2005-11-01

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