Definitions

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Etymologies

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Examples

  • She was invited to attend a Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC, pronounced "Snick") meeting at a church near her home.

    Elizabeth Kucinich and Fannie Lou Hamer - Soul Sisters

  • By the time the third volume opens, in 1965, King has switched his emphasis from desegregation to the drive for voting rights in Selma, Alabama, a project on which the SCLC was cooperating with the Student Non-violent Coordinating Committee (SNCC, pronounced "Snick"), the organization formed in 1960 to give young blacks a stronger voice in the movement.

    An American Iliad

  • Emerging in 1960 out of meetings that SCLC’s former director Ella Baker held with students at Shaw University in Raleigh, North Carolina, SNCC commonly called Snick became one of the leading civil rights groups of the 1960s, with members participating in the Freedom Rides, sit-ins, boycotts, voter-registration drives, and other key direct-action programs.

    Burial for a King

  • Emerging in 1960 out of meetings that SCLC’s former director Ella Baker held with students at Shaw University in Raleigh, North Carolina, SNCC commonly called Snick became one of the leading civil rights groups of the 1960s, with members participating in the Freedom Rides, sit-ins, boycotts, voter-registration drives, and other key direct-action programs.

    Burial for a King

  • Emerging in 1960 out of meetings that SCLC’s former director Ella Baker held with students at Shaw University in Raleigh, North Carolina, SNCC commonly called Snick became one of the leading civil rights groups of the 1960s, with members participating in the Freedom Rides, sit-ins, boycotts, voter-registration drives, and other key direct-action programs.

    Burial for a King

  • Emerging in 1960 out of meetings that SCLC’s former director Ella Baker held with students at Shaw University in Raleigh, North Carolina, SNCC commonly called Snick became one of the leading civil rights groups of the 1960s, with members participating in the Freedom Rides, sit-ins, boycotts, voter-registration drives, and other key direct-action programs.

    Burial for a King

  • The Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee, called "Snick," became the civil rights movement's most radical arm.

    News & Record Article Feed

  • The Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee, called "Snick," became the civil rights movement's most radical arm.

    News & Record Article Feed

  • The student-led group known as SNCC (pronounced "Snick") grew into a powerful force that fought alongside Martin Luther King Jr. and helped end much of the institutionalized segregation in the South, using their bodies as their primary tools of protest.

    News & Observer: Home Page

  • The Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee, called "Snick," became the civil rights movement's most radical arm.

    News & Record Article Feed

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