Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun Plural form of Spenserian.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • At BU I had one student go totally nuts and write a series of TEN Spenserians, all fantastical and allegorical--and although they were damn awkward syntactically, she had the form down cold.

    Archive 2007-03-01

  • At BU I had one student go totally nuts and write a series of TEN Spenserians, all fantastical and allegorical--and although they were damn awkward syntactically, she had the form down cold.

    Ferule & Fescue

  • Clare imitates the Spenserians of Childe Harold but typically drops the final alexandrine, the formal sign of chivalric romance.

    Like

  • A protest, it is said, against love poems, but also, I think, against the pastoral allegorical poetry of the Cambridge Spenserians.

    Notes: Divine Poems. Grierson, Herbert J.C

  • The language, too, is not obtrusively archaic as it is in Chatterton and some of the Spenserians; at most an occasional "wist" or "eftsoons"; now and then a light accent, in ballad fashion, on the final syllable of a rime-word like mariner or countrie.

    A History of English Romanticism in the Nineteenth Century

  • The first two, as we have seen, were among the earliest Spenserians: Dyer was a landscape painter, as well as a poet; and Shenstone was one of the best of landscape gardeners.

    A History of English Romanticism in the Eighteenth Century

  • One of the earlier Spenserians was Gilbert West, the translator of

    A History of English Romanticism in the Eighteenth Century

  • Akenside ranks among the earlier Spenserians by virtue of his "Virtuoso"

    A History of English Romanticism in the Eighteenth Century

  • These two poems have the freedom and frolic, the natural grace of movement, the improvisation, of the best Elizabethan examples, while both thoughts and words are under a strict economy unknown to the diffuse exuberance of the Spenserians.

    Milton

  • Clevelands, the Denhams, and the Drydens, whom he did not account as poets at all, but even from the Spenserians.

    Milton

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