Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • proper n. Archaic form of Spinozism.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • The declaration that the Deity is “the sole Operant” (Religious Musings) is indeed far too bold: may easily be misconstrued into Spinosism; and, therefore, though it is susceptible of a pious and justifiable interpretation, I should by no means now use such a phrase.

    Reminiscences of Samuel Taylor Coleridge, and Robert Southey

  • Spinosism; and he expressed it coarsely and in the way most likely to give offence.

    Note Book of an English Opium-Eater

  • Bossuet has recourse to Spinosism, and dares make God the substance and sole 'ens reale' of all body, and by this very 'hypothesis' baffles his own end, and does away all miracle in the particular instance.

    The Literary Remains of Samuel Taylor Coleridge

  • Spinosism; and, therefore, though it is susceptible of a pious and justifiable interpretation, I should by no means now use such a phrase.

    Reminiscences of Samuel Taylor Coleridge and Robert Southey

  • Strong feeling and an active intellect conjoined, lead almost necessarily, in the first stage of philosophising, to Spinosism.

    Literary Remains, Volume 1

  • According to these notions we shall be justified in taxing him with having announced in a very clear, in a most unequivocal manner, that this is nature herself: this indeed is a pure Spinosism; it was decidedly on the principles of Descartes that Spinosa drew up his system; in fact it flows out of it consecutively.

    The System of Nature, Volume 2

  • 'hollow faith', and for an 'ambiguous purpose', [29] my mind then wavering in its necessary passage from Unitarianism (which, as I have often said, is the religion of a man, whose reason would make him an atheist, but whose heart and common sense will not permit him to be so) through Spinosism into Plato and St. John.

    The Life of Samuel Taylor Coleridge 1838

  • Voltaire, treating upon Spinosism, says: “I am aware that various philosophers, and especially Lucretius, have denied final causes.

    The Christian Foundation, Or, Scientific and Religious Journal, February, 1880

  • Christianity; on another page we find him saying, "My Spinosism (if

    Poems of Coleridge

  • Spinosism it be, and i 'faith 'tis very like it) "; and then comes the solemn assurance:" I am a Berkleyan. "

    Poems of Coleridge

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.