Definitions

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun (Roman Catholic Church) one of the great Fathers of the early Christian Church whose major work was his translation of the Scriptures from Hebrew and Greek into Latin (which became the Vulgate); a saint and Doctor of the Church (347-420)

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • That stinking of St. Jerome, which is not a veritable article of faith in the Church, is, however, an object of pious belief; and my readers will very gladly assent to it.

    Satyricon

  • "An altogether wise and holy man, called St. Jerome," I said.

    My New Curate

  • That stinking of St. Jerome, which is not a veritable article of faith in the Church, is, however, an object of pious belief; and my readers will very gladly assent to it.

    The Satyricon — Volume 07: Marchena Notes

  • That stinking of St. Jerome, which is not a veritable article of faith in the Church, is, however, an object of pious belief; and my readers will very gladly assent to it.

    The Satyricon — Complete

  • He did not live to finish his last picture, a St. Jerome, which is inscribed "Vincencius Carducho hic vitam non opus finit 1638", and his death occurred while under confinement, as he lost his reason early in 1638.

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 3: Brownson-Clairvaux

  • But it has brilliant beauty and the St. Jerome is a delightful old personage.

    Italian Hours

  • (commonly known as St. Jerome), perhaps the most capable Bible scholar of the time, to translate the scriptures into Latin.

    Latest Articles

  • The first Italian monks aimed at reproducing exactly what was done in Egypt and not a few -- such as St. Jerome, Rufinus, Paula,

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 10: Mass Music-Newman

  • But the worthy little man assumes a bolder tone, when he quotes from the fathers of the church; such as St. Jerome, who gives it as the opinion of all the doctors, that the air is filled with powers opposed to each other; and Lactantius, who says that corrupt and dangerous spirits wander over the earth, and seek to console themselves for their own fall by effecting the ruin of the human race; and Clemens

    Bracebridge Hall, or The Humorists

  • Separation of the sexes was strictly enforced at St. Jerome and most other parochial schools of the time: boys on one side of the class, girls on the other.

    Kill the Irishman

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