Definitions

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. (New Testament) the Apostle closely associated with St. Paul and traditionally assumed to be the author of the third Gospel

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Wellhausen's idea that St. Matthew composed it from St. Luke is untenable.

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 11: New Mexico-Philip

  • 'You would perhaps feel interested in knowing that the Gospel of St. Luke has been printed in the Mota language, to a great extent by our scholars, and that George Sarawia is printing now the Acts, composing it, and doing press-work and all.

    Life of John Coleridge Patteson

  • I was in the hospital to-day, talked a little, and read St. Luke xv. to one, and prayed with another Maori.

    Life of John Coleridge Patteson

  • In St. Luke the two debtors is spoken by our Lord to Simon "the leper" (Mark 14: 2-9) on occasion of Mary Magdalene's conversion, with its touching circumstances.

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 11: New Mexico-Philip

  • Even in the Acts of the Apostles (i, 3) St. Luke speaks of those to whom Christ "shewed himself alive after his passion" (meta to mathein autou).

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 11: New Mexico-Philip

  • The well-known passage from the Gospel of St. Luke offered a final prayer: “Suffer little Children to come unto Me—for of such is the kingdom of God.”

    First Man

  • If, like Maldonatus and Theophylact, we identify this with the great supper in St. Luke (14: 16), we must allow that the differences observable are due to the inspired reporters who had in view "not history but doctrine".

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 11: New Mexico-Philip

  • Let students compare any passage of St. Luke or St. John, however surprising the miracle which it relates, with St. Jerome's life of Paul the First Hermit, or with that famous letter of his to Eustochium, which (although historically important) is unfit for the eyes of pure-minded readers and does not appear in this volume; and let them judge for themselves.

    The Hermits

  • It was the Twenty - third Sunday after Trinity, and the subject he took was from the second lesson, the Parable of the Pounds, in St. Luke xix., and so pointed out the difficulties between the reception of a talent and the use of it.

    Life of John Coleridge Patteson

  • The prologue of St. Luke is manifestly cited in the fragment, so that Papias and the Presbyter knew that Gospel, which was presumable preferred to that of Mark in the Pauline Church of Ephesus; hence the need of the rehabilitation of Mark by "the Presbyter", who speaks with authority as one who knew the facts of the life of Christ as well as Peter himself.

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 11: New Mexico-Philip

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