Stars and Bars love

Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • noun The first Confederate flag.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun the first flag of the Confederate States of America

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Stars and Bars, which I just read, is not as good as those books.

    An Englishman in Dixie

  • Without the umlaut, some might have been assumed that you defend the flying of Stars and Bars because you're a believer in states rights rather than slavery.

    Archive 2005-08-07

  • Without the umlaut, some might have been assumed that you defend the flying of Stars and Bars because you're a believer in states rights rather than slavery.

    08/07/2005 - 08/14/2005

  • She had looked most fetching, wearing a modestly draped Greek robe of white cheesecloth girdled with red and blue and holding the Stars and Bars in one hand, while with the other she stretched out to the kneeling Captain Carey Ashburn, of Alabama, the gold-hilted saber which had belonged to Charles and his father.

    Gone with the Wind

  • She had looked most fetching, wearing a modestly draped Greek robe of white cheesecloth girdled with red and blue and holding the Stars and Bars in one hand, while with the other she stretched out to the kneeling Captain Carey Ashburn, of Alabama, the gold-hilted saber which had belonged to Charles and his father.

    Gone with the Wind

  • She had looked most fetching, wearing a modestly draped Greek robe of white cheesecloth girdled with red and blue and holding the Stars and Bars in one hand, while with the other she stretched out to the kneeling Captain Carey Ashburn, of Alabama, the gold-hilted saber which had belonged to Charles and his father.

    Gone with the Wind

  • She had looked most fetching, wearing a modestly draped Greek robe of white cheesecloth girdled with red and blue and holding the Stars and Bars in one hand, while with the other she stretched out to the kneeling Captain Carey Ashburn, of Alabama, the gold-hilted saber which had belonged to Charles and his father.

    Gone with the Wind

  • She had looked most fetching, wearing a modestly draped Greek robe of white cheesecloth girdled with red and blue and holding the Stars and Bars in one hand, while with the other she stretched out to the kneeling Captain Carey Ashburn, of Alabama, the gold-hilted saber which had belonged to Charles and his father.

    Gone with the Wind

  • The skill and character of Lee and his associates would however of course have been in vain and the lines would have been broken not in 1865, but in 1863 or in 1862, if it had not been for the magnificent patience and heroism of the rank and file that fought in the grey uniform under the Stars and Bars and whose fighting during the last of those months was done in tattered uniforms and with a ration less by from one quarter to one half than that which had been accepted as normal.

    Abraham Lincoln

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