Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • proper noun An Ancient Greek name, particularly borne by a Greek lyric poet from Himera in Sicily (640 - 555 BC).

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Ancient Greek Στησίχορος (Stēsikhoros).

Examples

  • The heroes at Troy fought for a phantom Helen, according to Stesichorus.

    Come With Me My Love To the Sea, the Sea of Love… « So Many Books

  • For they are mere shadows and pictures of the true, and are colored by contrast, which exaggerates both light and shade, and so they implant in the minds of fools insane desires of themselves; and they are fought about as Stesichorus says that the

    The Republic by Plato ; translated by Benjamin Jowett

  • Stesichorus says that the Greeks fought about the shadow of Helen at Troy, because they know not the truth.

    The Republic by Plato ; translated by Benjamin Jowett

  • The basic premise of Euripides' play is the idea, suggested by the poet Stesichorus, that Helen did not go to Troy with Paris.

    Archive 2005-03-01

  • The basic premise of Euripides' play is the idea, suggested by the poet Stesichorus, that Helen did not go to Troy with Paris.

    Helen and the Phantom Slut

  • Homer, nor Hesiod, nor Archilochus, nor Pisander, nor Stesichorus, nor Alcman, nor Pindar, makes any mention of the Egyptian or the

    Essays and Miscellanies

  • Stesichorus, Anacreon, and Simonides were employed in the noble task of compiling the Iliad and Odyssey, so much must have been done to arrange, to connect, to harmonize, that it is almost incredible that stronger marks of Athenian manufacture should not remain.

    The Odyssey of Homer

  • Stesichorus, Anacreon, and Simonides were employed in the noble task of compiling the Iliad and Odyssey, so much must have been done to arrange, to connect, to harmonize, that it is almost incredible, that stronger marks of Athenian manufacture should not remain.

    The Iliad of Homer

  • The liveliness of epigrammatic remarks is due to the meaning not being just what the words say: as in the saying of Stesichorus that ‘the cicalas will chirp to themselves on the ground’.

    Rhetoric

  • When the people of Himera had made Phalaris military dictator, and were going to give him a bodyguard, Stesichorus wound up a long talk by telling them the fable of the horse who had a field all to himself.

    Rhetoric

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