Definitions

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Etymologies

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Examples

  • Syncope is a more serious condition than lipothymy.

    Ildiko Csengei

  • Syncope is a means of protest, but it also serves as a survival strategy, representing the only (cut and broken) form in which Ophelia can become the protagonist of the narrative that is imposed on her by force.

    Ildiko Csengei

  • Various forms of Elision are called Syncope, Synizesis, and Synalœpha.

    The Principles of English Versification

  • "Syncope" is the word they use in the graphic; that just means fainting.

    CNN Transcript Jan 14, 2002

  • I should restate: the *s- would have started 'disappearing' in native roots, along with the Semitic doublets, some time after Syncope while the verb *steh₂- was coined *before* Syncope and was eventually treated the same as the doublets as if there was an original root **teh₂-.

    Suspicious IE roots, possibly deserving our scorn or maybe not

  • The Semitic doublets loaned into Pre-IE would be the trigger and from there, the pattern could be expanded to indistinguishable native roots like *steh₂-, which may be dated to after the period of Syncope.

    Suspicious IE roots, possibly deserving our scorn or maybe not

  • I have a feeling that you're going to explain this form with Etruscan Syncope, but could you illustrate how you imagine this happened?

    Missing honey

  • Syncope, in the sense of contraction or elision, is also the name of a poetic device used for securing the cadence of a line, or making the line fit into the syllable pattern of the stanza.

    Ildiko Csengei

  • Syncope looks like a short, temporary death, from which the patient slowly comes back to life as the circulation is restored and all the suppressed

    Ildiko Csengei

  • Syncope, according to Robert James, is "a sudden Check or Stop put to the Motion of the Heart."

    Ildiko Csengei

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