Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • proper n. An Ancient Greek name, particularly borne by a Greek poet and citharede of Antissa in Lesbos who lived about the first half of the 7th century BC.

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Ancient Greek Τέρπανδρος (Terpandros).

Examples

  • The reputation of a poet called Terpander, for instance, who came from the Lesbian city of Antissa and is listed on an extant monument as the winner of a song competition that occurred in the 670s BC, was such that he was credited — apocryphally, undoubtedly — with having invented the seven-stringed lyre.

    In Search of Sappho

  • His is the greatest and the most surprising musical revolution since Terpander, the Greek musician, added two notes to the Chinese pentaphonic scale twenty six centuries ago '.

    Did you know? Mexico's Nobel Prize nominee and music revolutionary

  • The hymn must therefore be later than that date, though Terpander, according to Weir Smyth 16, may have only modified the scale of the lyre; yet while the burlesque character precludes an early date, this feature is far removed, as Allen and Sikes remark, from the silliness of the “Battle of the Frogs and Mice”, so that a date in the earlier part of the sixth century is most probable.

    Hesiod, Homeric Hymns, and Homerica

  • Indeed, if we will take the pains to consider their compositions, some of which were still extant in our days, and the airs on the flute to which they marched when going to battle, we shall find that Terpander and Pindar had reason to say that music and valor were allied.

    The Lives of the Noble Grecians and Romans

  • And, accordingly, when the Thebans made their invasion into Laconia, and took a great number of the Helots, they could by no means persuade them to sing the verses of Terpander, Alcman, or Spendon,

    The Lives of the Noble Grecians and Romans

  • For it is well known that he himself gladly kept Terpander, Thales, and Pherecycles, though they were strangers, because he perceived they were in their poems and in their philosophy of the same mind with him.

    The Lives of the Noble Grecians and Romans

  • Now the period which may with the greatest probability be fixed upon as having first witnessed the formation even of the narrowest reading class in Greece, is the middle of the seventh century before the Christian aera (B.C. 660 to B.C. 630), the age of Terpander, Kallinus, Archilochus, Simenides of Amorgus, &c.

    The Odyssey of Homer

  • Terpander, according to Weir Smyth [1116], may have only modified the scale of the lyre; yet while the burlesque character precludes an early date, this feature is far removed, as Allen and Sikes remark, from the silliness of the "Battle of the Frogs and Mice", so that a date in the earlier part of the sixth century is most probable.

    Hesiod, the Homeric Hymns, and Homerica

  • For, while about the middle or latter end of the seventh century, B.C., the names of Archilochus and Terpander adorn the page of musical history, followed by many others, including

    Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine — Volume 53, No. 327, January, 1843

  • Lacedæmonians; Terpander came, and with his lyre at once appeased the angry multitude.

    Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine — Volume 53, No. 327, January, 1843

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