Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. One of the ancient Trojans.
  • adj. Pertaining to the ancient Trojans.

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

Latin Teucrius, from Teucri pl. the Trojans. From Teucer, the first king of Troy.

Examples

  • Thou, Idmon, bear my message to the Phrygian monarch in this harsh wording: So soon as to-morrow's Dawn rises in the sky blushing on her crimson wheels, let him not loose Teucrian or Rutulian: let Teucrian and Rutulian arms have rest, and our blood decide the war; on that field let Lavinia be sought in marriage. '

    The Aeneid of Virgil

  • Then good Aeneas rent away the raiment from his shoulders and called the gods to aid, stretching forth his hands: 'Jupiter omnipotent, if thou hatest not Troy yet wholly to her last man, if thine ancient pity looks at all on human woes, now, O Lord, grant our fleet to escape the flame, and rescue from doom the slender Teucrian estate.

    The Aeneid of Virgil

  • When now they shall plight peace with prosperous marriages (be it so!), when now they shall join in laws and treaties, bid thou not the native Latins change their name of old, nor become Trojans and take the Teucrian name, or change their language, or alter their attire: let Latium be, let Alban kings endure through ages, let Italian valour be potent in the race of Rome.

    The Aeneid of Virgil

  • This day wilt thou either bring back in triumph the gory head and spoils of Aeneas, and we will avenge Lausus 'agonies; or if no force opens a way, thou wilt die with me: for I deem not, bravest, thou wilt deign to bear an alien rule and a Teucrian lord.'

    The Aeneid of Virgil

  • Rumour is that in his headlong hurry, when mounting behind his yoked horses to begin the battle, he left his father's sword behind and caught up his charioteer Metiscus 'weapon; and that served him long, while Teucrian stragglers turned their backs; when it met the divine Vulcanian armour, the mortal blade like brittle ice snapped in the stroke; the shards lie glittering upon the yellow sand.

    The Aeneid of Virgil

  • Teucrian army gathers thickly, still grasping shield and spear.

    The Aeneid of Virgil

  • Their very foe would extol the Teucrians with highest praises, and boasted himself a branch [626-661] of the ancient Teucrian stem.

    The Aeneid of Virgil

  • Hapless Ufens is fallen, not to see our shame; corpse and armour are in Teucrian hands.

    The Aeneid of Virgil

  • Dardanus, who sailed to the Teucrian land, the first father and founder of the Ilian city, was born, as

    The Aeneid of Virgil

  • Again is an alien bride the source of all that Teucrian woe, again a foreign marriage-chamber ....

    The Aeneid of Virgil

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