Truman Doctrine love

Truman Doctrine

Definitions

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun President Truman's policy of providing economic and military aid to any country threatened by communism or totalitarian ideology

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • The speech, a landmark in the emerging Cold War, initiated what became known as the Truman Doctrine and launched a new era in postwar American foreign policy.

    The Prize

  • The speech, a landmark in the emerging Cold War, initiated what became known as the Truman Doctrine and launched a new era in postwar American foreign policy.

    The Prize

  • For example, Ambassador William Sullivan, now Deputy Assistant Secretary of State for East Asian and Pacific Affairs, makes the absurd claim that the Truman Doctrine is a "parsing" of the UN Charter (Symington Subcommittee Hearings).

    A Special Supplement: Cambodia

  • For example, U.S. success in helping to crush communist insurgents in Greece in 1947–49—the very real Marxism-spouting “terrorists” who energized the Truman Doctrine—might prove treacherous support for what could be achieved in different terrain, against different people, and embroiling different nations.

    Magic and Mayhem

  • To a considerable extent, in fact, the great postwar strategic pronouncements -- the Truman Doctrine, the Eisenhower Doctrine, the Nixon Doctrine, and especially the Carter Doctrine -- were all tied to the protection of these “filling stations.”

    Michael T. Klare: Twenty-First Century Energy Superpower: China, Energy, and Global Power

  • Harry Truman, in 1947, to pledge unlimited military support for nations under Communist threat, known as the Truman Doctrine.

    The Submarine Deals That Helped Sink Greece

  • The Monroe Doctrine since the 19th century offers ample evidence, and then add the Truman Doctrine, NATO and the now-forgotten CENTO and SEATO.

    Stanley Kutler: The March of Obama's Empire

  • When Britain sent word early in 1947 that it could no longer afford its commitments in Greece and Turkey, the U.S. administration responded with the Truman Doctrine, taking over the commitments as its own and making plain its intention of blocking further advances of Soviet influence, whether direct or indirect.

    How Wars end

  • The Monroe Doctrine since the 19th century offers ample evidence, and then add the Truman Doctrine, NATO and the now-forgotten CENTO and SEATO.

    Stanley Kutler: The March of Obama's Empire

  • To a considerable extent, in fact, the great postwar strategic pronouncements -- the Truman Doctrine, the Eisenhower Doctrine, the Nixon Doctrine, and especially the Carter Doctrine -- were all tied to the protection of these “filling stations.”

    Michael T. Klare: Twenty-First Century Energy Superpower: China, Energy, and Global Power

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