Definitions

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Etymologies

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Examples

  • Consider, for instance, the following passage from the book, which describes his daily breakfast routine during the 70s: I would take a barbiturate to wake up … a Tuinal, pin it, put a needle in it so it would come on quicker.

    Life by Keith Richards

  • At least she never got involved with heavy downers like reds and Tuinal.

    Last Words

  • The night before a particularly big day in court, my brother and I stopped by his pill doctor and picked up some Tuinal.

    HIGH ON ARRIVAL

  • • Tuinal, for insomnia - a side effect of the cortisone

    Taylor Marsh: The Thought of 'President Sarah Palin' Scares the Crap out of Me

  • I was one of the last ones to leave before the city condemned the place, and in my boozy, cokey, Tuinal daze, I fancied myself quite the land pirate.

    Occupational Hazards

  • His physicians administered large doses of so many drugs that Travell kept a "Medicine Administration Record," cataloguing injected and ingested corticosteroids for his adrenal insufficiency; procaine shots and ultrasound treatments and hot packs for his back; Lomotil, Metamucil, paregoric, phenobarbital, testosterone, and trasentine to control his diarrhea, abdominal discomfort, and weight loss; penicillin and other antibiotics for his urinary-tract infections and an abscess; and Tuinal to help him sleep.

    Pulling Back the Curtain

  • At their flat in Kensington, in London, Arthur Koestler and his wife, Cynthia, shared their own lethal cocktail of Tuinal and alcohol, and died together.

    New Statesman

  • The barbiturates in the Tuinal were quick-acting, and their effect was speeded up by the alcohol.

    Culture | guardian.co.uk

  • On a small table between them was a bottle of wine, a large bottle of Tuinal sleeping tablets and a jar of honey.

    Culture | guardian.co.uk

  • They sipped their drinks and steadily chewed on the Tuinal tablets coated with honey until one by one they slipped into a coma and passed away.

    Culture | guardian.co.uk

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