Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. Variant of Turkmen.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • proper n. A member of a tribe of Turanians inhabiting a region east of the Caspian Sea.
  • proper n. A Turcoman carpet.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. See Turkoman.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. a member of a Turkic people living in Turkmenistan and neighboring areas
  • n. the Turkic language spoken by the Turkoman

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Turcoman legends (evidently pose-Mohammedan) Noah gave his son,

    The Book of The Thousand Nights And A Night

  • (Also, many Iraqi Shiites have Turcoman, Persian, or Kurdish ancestors.)

    The Victor?

  • Iraqi Kurdistan covers mainly a population of Sunni Kurds, with minorities including Shia Kurds, Turcoman and Assyrians.

    Archive 2006-10-01

  • The Turcoman and berkuti pix are fantastic as is the rest of his work - just that I can pretend I'm i thsoe 2.

    One More

  • South Russia, Afghan horse-dealers, Turcoman merchants, pilgrims on the road to Mecca, sheikhs in North Africa, sailors on the Black

    Greenmantle

  • His hands were lashed behind his back with rawhide cords and a Turcoman warrior took his stallion on a lead rein.

    The Falcons of Montabard

  • It was like the time he had stood on the battlefield at Dorylaeum as a young footsoldier and felt the vibration of hooves as the Saracens pounded towards their lines on their swift Turcoman horses.

    The Falcons of Montabard

  • “Albatross” from the funnels of the Ashurada streamers, which the Russians keep as the police of these Turcoman waters.

    Robur the Conqueror

  • The lines of the Ichim and the Irtych are now in our power; and the Turcoman horsemen can bathe their horses in the now

    Michael Strogoff

  • Then in the distance rose several thousand of the Turcoman tents, called “karaoy,” which had been carried on the backs of camels.

    Michael Strogoff

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