Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Plural form of Volscian.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • As soon as this announcement was made in the senate, a levy was ordered: the consuls were commanded to divide the management of the war between them; that the Volscians should be the province of the one, the

    The History of Rome, Books 01 to 08

  • When the Romans heard the message, they indignantly replied, that the Volscians were the first that took up arms, but the Romans would be the last to lay them down.

    Coriolanus

  • The Romans were very indignant when they heard these demands, and made answer, that the Volscians might be the first to take up arms, but that the Romans would be the last to lay them down.

    Plutarch's Lives, Volume I

  • All the shoot-em-up arcade game depictions of the war between a US-like Rome and the Balkan-like Volscians, and the putting of Shakespeare's lines into the mouths of newscasters such as Peter Snow, seem moot since those very words describe defunct codes of military honour.

    Berlin film festival – review

  • Volscians to break their truce with Rome and raise an army to invade.

    The Tragedy of Coriolanus

  • Volscians, who waged war not without honor against the Romans.

    The Lives of the Noble Grecians and Romans

  • I am Caius Marcius, the author of so much mischief to the Volscians; of which, were I seeking to deny it, the surname of Coriolanus I now bear would be a sufficient evidence against me.

    The Lives of the Noble Grecians and Romans

  • Tullus, therefore, began to dread the issue of the defense he was going to make for himself; for he was an admirable speaker, and the former services he had done the Volscians had procured and still preserved for him greater kindness than could be outweighed by any blame for his late conduct.

    The Lives of the Noble Grecians and Romans

  • This, those of the Volscians who had long envied his reputation, and could not endure to see the influence he had with the people laid hold of, as the first matter of complaint against him.

    The Lives of the Noble Grecians and Romans

  • After this incursion and exploit, which was of great advantage to the Volscians, as they learned by it to grow more hardy and to contemn their enemy, Marcius drew them off, and returned in safety.

    The Lives of the Noble Grecians and Romans

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