Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • An autonomous region of China in the southwest part of the country north and west of the Himalaya Mountains. Controlled by China since 1720, it became an autonomous province in 1951 and was formally proclaimed an autonomous region in 1965. Xizang is a center of Buddhism, but many Buddhists have fled since the 1950s to escape religious persecution. Lhasa is the capital. Population: 2,610,000.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • proper n. The abbreviation for Xizang (Tibet) Autonomous Region of the People’s Republic of China.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. an autonomous region of the Peoples Republic of China; located in the Himalayas

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • If successful, the IPO would be the world's biggest so far this year, according to Dealogic, surpassing the $127 million offering by Chinese health-care company Xizang Haisco Pharmaceutical Group Co Ltd. in Shenzhen.

    Sunshine Oilsands Cleared for Hong Kong IPO

  • XAYKAOTHAO: Eighty-year-old Thai Helli (ph) was born in Xizang, South Korea, then joined U.S. forces as an intelligence officer during the war.

    Korean War Vets Return To The Scene Of Battle

  • Xizang Tonglan (A comprehensive view of Tibet) (Taibei: Huawenshuju, 1969); for the early medieval ages, see Beckwith 1987 and Zhang Yun, Silu Wenhua: Tubo Juan (The Silk Road cultures: Tibet) (Hangzhou: Zhejiang Renmin Chubanshe, 1995); for the route between Chang'an, Tibet, and Nepal, see Lu Yaoguang 1989. back

    Between Winds and Clouds: The Making of Yunnan (Second Century BCE to Twentieth Century CE)

  • Yamagata, Hatsuo, ed. Xizang Tonglan (A comprehensive view of Tibet).

    Between Winds and Clouds: The Making of Yunnan (Second Century BCE to Twentieth Century CE)

  • This ecoregion covers the western part of Qinghai-Xizang Plateau, an intermontane basin surrounded by the Kunlun and Gandise mountains.

    Central Tibetan Plateau alpine steppe

  • Some of these species occur at very high altitudes; for example, the Xizang alpine toad (Scutiger boulengeri) is found to elevations of more than 5,000 meters above sea level.

    Biological diversity in the mountains of Southwest China

  • Temperatures range from frost-free throughout the year in parts of Yunnan and short, frost-free periods at the northern boundary of the region, to permanent glaciers on the high mountain peaks of Sichuan, Yunnan, and Xizang.

    Biological diversity in the mountains of Southwest China

  • The $4 billion Qinghai-Xizang railway -- a remarkable system that transports passengers to an altitude 16,000 feet so high that ballpoint pens can explode en route from the air-pressure change -- traverses 1,200 miles of rugged terrain to connect the rest of China to the remote Tibetan plateau.

    Archive 2008-02-01

  • The $4 billion Qinghai-Xizang railway -- a remarkable system that transports passengers to an altitude (16,000 feet) so high that ballpoint pens can explode en route from the air-pressure change -- traverses 1,200 miles of rugged terrain to connect the rest of China to the remote Tibetan plateau.

    China Eats Crow

  • Update, Apr 15, 2007: This post originally included a picture from the final slide of a presentation by Shao et al here entitled “A Dendroclimatic Study of Qilian Juniper in the northeast Qinghai-Xizang Tibet Plateau”, which shows a photograph of a tree in a desert.

    A Project for the Dendro Truth Squad « Climate Audit

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