Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • noun The twin brother of Amphion.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun Same as Cybele, 2.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • In it too were the twin sons of Antiope, daughter of Asopus, Amphion and Zethus, and Thebe still ungirt with towers was lying near, whose foundations they were just then laying in eager haste.

    The Argonautica

  • Now there is an ancient legend amongst the race of Cadmus, that one Lycus in days gone by was husband to Dirce being king of this city with its seven towers, before that Amphion and Zethus, sons of Zeus, lords of the milk-white steeds, became rulers in the land.

    Heracles

  • Now there is an ancient legend amongst the race of Cadmus, that one Lycus in days gone by was husband to Dirce being king of this city with its seven towers, before that Amphion and Zethus, sons of Zeus, lords of the milk-white steeds, became rulers in the land.

    Heracles

  • Zethus on his shoulders was lifting the peak of a steep mountain, like a man toiling hard, and Amphion after him, singing loud and clear on his golden lyre, moved on, and a rock twice as large followed his footsteps.

    The Argonautica

  • Who is that youth passing close to the tomb of Zethus, with long flowing hair, but a look of fury in his eye? is he a captain? for crowds of warriors follow at his heels.

    The Phoenissae

  • Who is that youth passing close to the tomb of Zethus, with long flowing hair, but a look of fury in his eye? is he a captain? for crowds of warriors follow at his heels.

    The Phoenissae

  • In sculpture Amphion is always represented with a lyre; Zethus with a club.

    Myths and Legends of Ancient Greece and Rome

  • The punishment of Dirce at the hands of Amphion and Zethus forms the subject of the world-renowned marble group in the museum at Naples, known by the name of the Farnese Bull.

    Myths and Legends of Ancient Greece and Rome

  • His brother, Zethus, was famous for his skill in archery, and was passionately fond of the chase.

    Myths and Legends of Ancient Greece and Rome

  • On the way to Thebes she gave birth to her twin-sons, Amphion and Zethus, who, by the orders of Lycus, were at once exposed on Mount Cithaeron, and would have perished but for the kindness of a shepherd, who took pity on them and preserved their lives.

    Myths and Legends of Ancient Greece and Rome

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