Definitions

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Etymologies

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Examples

  • As the valley went dark, a full moon rose from the Sangres.

    Stallion Gate

  • She seemed a full moon rising and a gazelle browsing, a girl of nine plus five288 shaming the moon and sun, even as saith of her the sayer eloquent and ingenious,

    The Book of The Thousand Nights And A Night

  • On my TV screen a full moon is rising, the Duchess and her fiendish lackeys are plotting new devilment, and justice, in the form of a flame-haired female privateer, is riding into the dark and unholy night.

    The Warslayer

  • She told them about the rare parties, how they were held during a full moon so that country gentry could find their way in their carriages, chaises and troikas.

    SNOW

  • There was a full moon two hours after nightfall; freed from the encumbrance of their togas, Cotta and his five very soberly silent companions ate at Aurelius’s table, then got ready to ride south.

    The First Man in Rome

  • I beheld a damsel, white as a full moon when it mooneth on its fourteenth night, with joined eyebrows twain and languorous lids of eyne, breasts like pomegranates twin and dainty, lips like double carnelian, a mouth as it were the seal-of Solomon, and teeth ranged in a line that played with the reason of proser and rhymer, even as saith the poet,

    The Book of The Thousand Nights And A Night

  • Salamander Dance which came into fashion around this time, especially in high society, and which Bishop Hiram declared to be the most depraved dance he had ever heard described.) The dance took place on evenings when there was a full moon (apart from in the breeding season).

    The War with the Newts

  • A mole is sometimes compared also to an ant creeping on the cheek towards the honey of the mouth; a handsome face is both a full moon and day; black hair is night; the waist is a willow-branch or a lance; the water of the face is self-respect: a poet sells the water of his face309 when he bestows mercenary praises on a rich patron.

    The Book of The Thousand Nights And A Night

  • It gave more light than a full moon ever gave on Earth, edging the long strands of the boulder-strewn plain with rifts and darts of thin pale silver.

    New Race

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