Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • adj. Not associated with or derived from living organisms.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • adj. Pertaining to the study of inanimate things.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • Not biological; not pertaining to biology.

Etymologies

a- (“without”) +‎ biological (“relating to life”) (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • This sort of thinking still gets a lot of play in American academe; it's a shame we Yanks aren't as relaxed as the French (I don't speak here of old-school French feminists, who are arguably among the worst offenders in the "abiological" movement), who take female sexuality to be an advantage, even a weapon -- a worldview that's closer to the truth than the twisted gospel preached in American classrooms.

    BigHominid's Hairy Chasms

  • Hormonal change starts not long after this process ends: evenat14, 15and 16, we are still dealing with teenagers whose intelligence is set, and whose emotional development – at least on abiological level – is well underway.

    2008 June 04 « shattersnipe: malcontent & rainbows

  • For all we know, a lot of oil that's been found already was abiological in its ultimate origin.

    The Bottomless Well?

  • If analysis of that oil found less evidence of biological material than in oil from other sources, then that might lend credence to its abiological origin.

    The Bottomless Well?

  • I also like McElroy's contention, quoted above, because it points to a major philosophical flaw in the abiological paleofeminist victimization stance.

    BigHominid's Hairy Chasms

  • Designing and constructing a free living life form doesn't have to involve any (hopelessly) complicating assumptions (or hypotheses) such as "1) Life originated on the Earth, 2) Life is emergent from a specific set of naturally given abiological conditions, 3) We can identify those conditions on Earth, both coincident and causal, with the origin of life and reproduce those conditions in the laboratory and life will emerge."

    Dawkins on the OOL

  • Here's what I assume are the assumptions (LOL) that make it an entertaining subject matter to argue over: 1) Life originated on the Earth, 2) Life is emergent from a specific set of naturally given abiological conditions, 3) We can identify those conditions on Earth, both coincident and causal, with the origin of life and reproduce those conditions in the laboratory and life will emerge.

    Dawkins on the OOL

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