Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • adjective Archaic spelling of aboard.
  • adverb Archaic spelling of aboard.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Lucar, and he and I were boys about a ten year old, aboord of a

    Westward Ho!

  • The good old Lady commended her desire, and (even as if she had bene her Mother) tooke her with her aboord

    The Decameron

  • And for her further recreation, he gave order to have a day of fishing, he going aboord a small Pinnace among the Fishers, and she in another, consorted with divers other Gentlewomen, in whose company she was very well pleased.

    The Decameron

  • Messer Gasparino, and going aboord the Gallies which were bound for

    The Decameron

  • Having first used some encouraging speeches, for more resolute prosecution of the enterprize, hee sent troope secretly to the Port, that they might not bee hindred of going aboord the ship, when the urgent necessity should require it.

    The Decameron

  • Entering aboord the Barke, and making it their owne by full possession, all the men they threw over-boord, without sparing any but Landolpho himselfe, whom they mounted into one of the Carrackes, leaving him nothing but a poore shirt of

    The Decameron

  • The joviall dayes of feasting being past, he went aboord a

    The Decameron

  • Beritola went aboord with Conrado and his Wife, being followed by the two young Goates and their Damme; and because her name should bee knowne to none but Conrado, and his wife onely, shee would be stiled no otherwise but the Goatherdesse.

    The Decameron

  • Madam Beritola not knowing (in so sudden and strange an alteration of State affaires) what was become of her Husband, fearing also greatly before, those inconveniences which afterward followed; being overcome with many passionate considerations, having left and forsaken all her goods, going aboord a small Barke with a Sonne of hers, aged about some eight yeeres, named Geoffrey, and growne great with child with another, she fled thence to

    The Decameron

  • Uppon sight of the Ship lying in that case, he imagined truely what had hapned, and commanded one of his men to enter aboord it, which (with some difficultie) hee did, to resolve his

    The Decameron

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