Definitions

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun The common wormwood, Artemisia Absinthium, a European species, much cultivated for its bitter qualities.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun (Bot.) The common wormwood (Artemisia absinthium), an intensely bitter plant, used as a tonic and for making the oil of wormwood.

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Latin absinthium, from Ancient Greek ἀψίνθιον (apsinthion), ἀσπίνθιον (apsinthion). The Ancient Greek word is of uncertain origin, albeit recognized as foreign (E.R. Wharton): underlain by a pre-Greek Pelasgian word, marked by the non-Indoeuropean consonant complex νθ. May be from Persian اسپند (ispand, "wild rue"). See also Absinthe on Wikipedia.

Examples

  • Absinthe is made by macerating herbs and spices, including anise and fennel, with the grand wormwood (Artemisia absinthium) that gives the drink its name.

    Absinthe Makes the Heart Grow Fonder

  • US Customs and Border Protection is responsible for checking all shipments from overseas, and the agency's take on the Green Fairy seems pretty cut-and-dried: "The importation of absinthe and any other liquors or liqueurs that contain Artemisia absinthium is prohibited."

    Mr. Know-It-All: Emailing China, Ordering Absinthe, Informing Your Kids

  • Now an environmental chemist from New Orleans named Ted Breaux claims to have re-created the original exactly, using a couple of hundred-year-old bottles of original Pernod absinthe to distill the recipe: a half-dozen-odd botanicals, including Spanish green anise, Alpine hyssop and absinthium.

    Real Absinthe

  • The Katzer pages and this botanical log confirm the similar Russian names: mugwort is Чернобыльник ( "Chernobylnik") or botanically Полынь Обыкновенная (Common Polyn);, and according to the southernwood page, wormwood aka Artemisia absinthium is Полынь горькая ( "Bitter Polyn" again).

    Archive 2004-05-01

  • The Katzer pages and this botanical log confirm the similar Russian names: mugwort is Чернобыльник ( "Chernobylnik") or botanically Полынь Обыкновенная (Common Polyn);, and according to the southernwood page, wormwood aka Artemisia absinthium is Полынь горькая ( "Bitter Polyn" again).

    A star called Mugwort

  • In Europe, however, this isn't the case; "wormwood" is used only for the absinth-producing species, Artemisia absinthium.

    Archive 2004-05-01

  • In Europe, however, this isn't the case; "wormwood" is used only for the absinth-producing species, Artemisia absinthium.

    A star called Mugwort

  • The most notorious herbal alcohol is absinthe, a green-tinged, anise-flavored liqueur whose main ingredient is parts of the wormwood plant, Artemisia absinthium.

    On Food and Cooking, The Science and Lore of the Kitchen

  • The most notorious herbal alcohol is absinthe, a green-tinged, anise-flavored liqueur whose main ingredient is parts of the wormwood plant, Artemisia absinthium.

    On Food and Cooking, The Science and Lore of the Kitchen

  • Die isolierung von weiteren kristallinin Substanzen aus Wermut (Artemisia absinthium L.).

    Chapter 5

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.