Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • adjective accusative

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • adjective containing or expressing accusation

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Sight-seers the Anchurians are by birth and habit, and they turned out to their last able-bodied unit to witness the scene; but they maintained an accusive silence.

    Cabbages and Kings

  • As for his wife, physiognomy championed her even in the face of their accusive talk.

    Cabbages and Kings

  • The comandante, Don Senor el Coronel Encarnación Rios, who was loyal to the Ins and suspected Goodwin's devotion to the Outs, hissed: "Aha!" and wrote in his secret memorandum book the accusive fact that Señor Goodwin had on that momentous date received a telegram.

    Cabbages and Kings

  • Another was an accusive and significant warning addressed to a notorious labour leader who was on the point of instigating his clients to a troublesome strike.

    Whirligigs

  • Goodwin's devotion to the Outs, hissed: "Aha!" and wrote in his secret memorandum book the accusive fact that Señor Goodwin had on that momentous date received a telegram.

    Cabbages and Kings

  • Into this place Soapy took his accusive shoes and telltale trousers without challenge.

    The Four Million

  • Sight-seers the Anchurians are by birth and habit, and they turned out to their last able-bodied unit to witness the scene; but they maintained an accusive silence.

    Cabbages and Kings

  • As for his wife, physiognomy championed her even in the face of their accusive talk.

    Cabbages and Kings

  • Thus, as if to challenge the poet's flaunt at romance and to punish him for his recreancy to the undying spirit of youth and beauty, this vision had dawned upon him with a thrilling and accusive power.

    The Voice of the City: Further Stories of the Four Million

  • Fortunately for themselves, most of the poets who have taken the poet's character as their theme, indulged their weakness for words before that long-suffering bookworm, the reader, had turned, but one who at the present day drags from cobwebby corners the accusive mass of material on the subject, must seek to justify, not merely the loquacity of its authors, but one's own temerity as well, in forcing it a second time upon the jaded attention of the public.

    The Poet's Poet : essays on the character and mission of the poet as interpreted in English verse of the last one hundred and fifty years

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