Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun The characteristic of being addictive.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Another core aspect of the addictiveness is their continuous nature.

    Breaking News: CBS News

  • With regard to my first point, it's very common (for me, at least) to sign up for a still-in-beta site after being digitally flirted with across a few channels, only to discover that the range, scope, usability, and urgency (what I'd call the addictiveness factors) of the offering weren't compelling enough to prompt return visits.

    Original Signal - Transmitting Web 2.0

  • As an addiction psychologist, much of the data with which he worked was drawn from laboratory trials with rats and monkeys: the 'addictiveness' of drugs such as opiates and cocaine was established by observing how frequently caged animals would push levers to obtain doses.

    American Samizdat: Rebel Scum Since 2001

  • As an addiction psychologist, much of the data with which he worked was drawn from laboratory trials with rats and monkeys: the 'addictiveness' of drugs such as opiates and cocaine was established by observing how frequently caged animals would push levers to obtain doses.

    3quarksdaily

  • 'addictiveness' of drugs such as opiates and cocaine was established by observing how frequently caged animals would push levers to obtain doses.

    Peak Energy

  • Heroin and crack cocaine were ranked 98 and 97 on this scale of addictiveness.

    BJ Gallagher: One Smoker's Battle to Quit

  • MY point as Moderator is that some of the postings are wandering off into various opinions as to the addictiveness of grass and so on.

    Page 2

  • MY point as Moderator is that some of the postings are wandering off into various opinions as to the addictiveness of grass and so on.

    Page 2

  • Or they get started on drugs (despite evidence for its destructive addictiveness).

    Poverty and Social Pressure, Arnold Kling | EconLog | Library of Economics and Liberty

  • Many studies relate the addictiveness of a game to its reward system and I agree that the rewards a game grants to its players do influence how rigorously it's played, but from experience and many stories around me I say that the fellow players play a much larger part in keeping someone coming back to the game than the reward system does.

    D&D last night

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