Definitions

from The Century Dictionary.

  • Containing admonition.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • adjective rare Admonitory.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • adjective Of or conveying admonition

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

admonition +‎ -ive

Examples

  • The kind, admonitive voice of the pilgrim possessed a peculiar power, which compelled Foma to listen to its deep tones.

    The Man Who Was Afraid

  • Oppressed by his gloominess, Foma had come down on the deck from his cabin, and, for some time, had been standing in the shadow of some wares covered with tarpaulin, and listened to the admonitive and gentle voice of the preacher.

    The Man Who Was Afraid

  • Sextus regards the observation of appearances as the basis of the practical arts (AM V. 1-2) and of the admonitive sign (PH II. 100; AM VIII. 152, 156-57).

    SKEPTICISM IN ANTIQUITY

  • The kind, admonitive voice of the pilgrim possessed a peculiar power, which compelled Foma to listen to its deep tones.

    The Man Who Was Afraid

  • Oppressed by his gloominess, Foma had come down on the deck from his cabin, and, for some time, had been standing in the shadow of some wares covered with tarpaulin, and listened to the admonitive and gentle voice of the preacher.

    The Man Who Was Afraid

  • Instead of being crushed at once, as perhaps the rider expected, it darted forward, quite briskly and cheerfully, at six or seven miles an hour; requiring no spur or admonitive to haste, except the shrieking of the little Egyptian gamin, who ran along by asinus’s side.

    Notes of a Journey From Cornhill to Grand Cairo

  • Sextus does not challenge the possibility of admonitive signs; they presuppose no necessary connection between sign and thing signified, and they are adequate to account for the connections that we establish between things in everyday activities (AM

    SKEPTICISM IN ANTIQUITY

  • Things nonapparent at the moment can be signified by present appearances that remind us of them (admonitive signs), as smoke is the sign of fire, a scab is the sign of a wound (AM

    SKEPTICISM IN ANTIQUITY

  • Instead of being crushed at once, as perhaps the writer expected, it darted forward, quite briskly and cheerfully, at six or seven miles an hour; requiring no spur or admonitive to haste, except the shrieking of the little Egyptian _gamin_, who ran along by asinus's side. "[

    Heads and Tales : or, Anecdotes and Stories of Quadrupeds and Other Beasts, Chiefly Connected with Incidents in the Histories of More or Less Distinguished Men.

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