Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • adj. Put in dread; afraid.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • adj. Put in dread; afraid.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • Same as adread, participial adjective

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Never did he lose heart, and of naught was he adrad.

    The Story of the Volsungs

  • And once again he spake, “A countenance of terror I bore up before all folk, after that I brooded over the heritage of my brother, and on every side did I spout out poison, so that none durst come anigh me, and of no weapon was I adrad, nor ever had I so many men before me, as that I deemed myself not stronger than all; for all men were sore afeard of me.”

    The Story of the Volsungs

  • Hogni said, “Do according to thy will; merrily will I abide whatso thou writ do against me; and thou shalt see that my heart is not adrad, for hard matters have I made trial of ere now, and all things that may try a man was I fain to bear, whiles yet I was unhurt; but now sorely am I hurt, and thou alone henceforth will bear mastery in our dealings together.”

    The Story of the Volsungs

  • Hadst thou never heard how that all folk were adrad of me, and of the awe of my countenance?

    The Story of the Volsungs

  • Now crept the worm down to his place of watering, and the earth shook all about him, and he snorted forth venom on all the way before him as he went; but Sigurd neither trembled nor was adrad at the roaring of him.

    The Story of the Volsungs

  • And Cosdroe, king of the Persians, subdued to his empire all the realms of the world; and he came into Jerusalem and was afeard and adrad of the sepulchre of our Lord, and returned, but he bare with him the part of the Holy Cross that S. Helena had left there.

    The Golden Legend, vol. 5

  • 'Ouvre,' he cried, 'ouvre,' or some such word, making signs for me to open the gate; and then 'Merci,' as though he were adrad of me.

    The White Company

  • ` Ouvre, 'he cried, ` ouvre,' or some such word, making signs for me to open the gate; and then ` Merci, 'as though he were adrad of me.

    The White Company

  • "Methought a bear came in," she says, "and brake up the king's high-seat, and shook his paws in such a wise that we were all adrad thereat, and he gat us all together into the mouth of him, so that we might avail us naught, and thereof fell great horror on us."

    The Story of the Volsungs

  • “Methought a bear came in,” she says, “and brake up the king’s high-seat, and shook his paws in such a wise that we were all adrad thereat, and he gat us all together into the mouth of him, so that we might avail us naught, and thereof fell great horror on us.”

    The Story of the Volsungs

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