Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A feudal serf or labourer who is attached to an estate and sold or transferred with it.
  • n. Something written or printed immediately after another character and aligned with it.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • adj. Held to service as attached to the soil; -- said of feudal serfs.
  • n. One held to service as attached to the glebe or estate; a feudal serf.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • Written after, as distinguished from subscript, or written under: as, in Greek grammar, an iota (ι) adscript.
  • Attached to the soil, as a slave or feudal serf. See adscriptus glebæ.
  • n. A serf attached to an estate and transferable with it.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • adj. written or printed immediately following another character and aligned with it
  • adj. (used of persons) bound to a tract of land; hence their service is transferable from owner to owner

Etymologies

Latin adscriptus, past participle of adscribere ("to enroll"). See ascribe. (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • You've got to write the adscript in solid English -- especially when you're talking about deception and tearing quotes out of context.

    "What's happened to John McCain? He's running the sleaziest ads ever. Truly vile."

  • The soul of man has never yet in any land been willingly adscript to the glebe.

    A Modern Utopia

  • Villeins, semi-entitled to half a bearskin of winter nights, seven yards from the fire, and adscript serfs, holding the reversion of a scraped marrow-bone under heriot (Aren't those beautiful words, Best Beloved?).

    Just So Stories

  • The writing is in elegant continuous uncials (capitals), in three columns, without initial letters or iota subscript or adscript.

    Smith's Bible Dictionary

  • While speaking of Antinous as a divinised man, adscript to the gods of Egypt, accepted as hero and as god in Hellas, Italy, and Asia

    Sketches and Studies in Italy and Greece, Complete Series I, II, and III

  • The divinised emperors were [Greek: paredroi] or [Greek: synthronoi]; nor did Virgil hesitate to flatter Augustus by questioning into which college of the immortals he would be adscript after death --

    Sketches and Studies in Italy and Greece, Complete Series I, II, and III

  • Returning from this excursion, and determining that Antinous was a hero or divinised mortal, adscript to the college of the greater gods, and invested with many of their attributes, we may next ask the question, why this artificial cult, due in the first place to imperial passion and caprice, and nourished by the adulation of fawning provinces, was preserved from the rapid dissolution to which the flimsy products of court-flattery are subject.

    Sketches and Studies in Italy and Greece, Complete Series I, II, and III

  • You've got to write the adscript in solid English -- specially when you're talking about deception and tearing quotes out of context.

    Althouse

  • As the bards recorded with a zeal and minuteness, so far as I can see, without parallel, the histories of the families to which they were adscript, so also they recorded with equal patience and care the far-extending pedigrees of those other families -- invisible indeed, but to them more real and more awe-inspiring -- who dwelt by the sacred lakes and rivers, and in the folds of the fairy hills, and the great raths and cairns reared for them by pious hands.

    Early Bardic Literature, Ireland.

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