Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun Plural form of adventuress.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • I knew all this because I read "Seaside Library" novels, in which, with the exception of the villains and adventuresses, all men and women thought beautiful thoughts, spoke a beautiful tongue, and performed glorious deeds.

    What Life Means to Me

  • I knew all this because I read "Seaside Library" 3 novels, in which, with the exception of the villains and adventuresses, all men and women thought beautiful thoughts, spoke a beautiful tongue, and performed glorious deeds.

    Chapter 5: The Philomaths

  • Woman that adventured were adventuresses, and the connotation was not nice.

    Chapter 6

  • She has had one inspiration showing genius, and that is the knack of selecting especially those adventuresses who have children, generally girls.

    Yvette

  • She well knew, from her experience, that her daughter could not marry a man who was rich and of good society, excepting by a totally improbable chance, by one of those surprises of love which place adventuresses on thrones.

    Yvette

  • She was, after all, one of the most remarkable adventuresses in history, with an intellect and personality to match her looks; for these gifts, rather than her capacity for scandalous behaviour, she is worth remembering.

    Royal Flash

  • I don't know, of course, what this girl's like; but half of them are adventuresses bent on marrying gentlemen.

    The Beth Book Being a Study of the Life of Elizabeth Caldwell Maclure, a Woman of Genius

  • Perhaps these harmless-looking young women were adventuresses, come into the neighborhood with some deep scheme, and the attractive shop as a blind.

    The Pleasant Street Partnership A Neighborhood Story

  • From the first he had allowed his reading to colour his impressions of life, and had obediently lived in a world of blacks and whites, of heroes and heroines, of villains and adventuresses, until the grateful discovery of the realistic school of fiction permitted him to believe that men and women were for the most part neither good nor bad, but tabby.

    The Ghost Ship

  • A couple of adventuresses, mother and daughter, swoop down upon him as a lawful prey, and he is quickly a doting husband and a terrified son-in-law.

    Lippincott's Magazine of Popular Literature and Science Volume 12, No. 33, December, 1873

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