Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • noun The use of atmospheric drag rather than onboard thrusters to reduce the velocity of a satellite or spacecraft.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun The use of atmospheric drag to reduce the velocity of a spacecraft, especially so as to establish a stable orbit and to reduce fuel consumption

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Using a new procedure called aerobraking, the robot spacecraft slowly adjusts to a circular orbit and in 1999 begins taking the first of almost 250,000 images of the Martian surface.

    Martians Remain Stubbornly Camera-Shy

  • Using a new procedure called aerobraking, the robot spacecraft slowly adjusts to a circular orbit and in 1999 begins taking the first of almost 250,000 images of the Martian surface.

    Martians Remain Stubbornly Camera-Shy

  • And this spacecraft will go through a series of so-called aerobraking maneuvers over the next few months.

    CNN Transcript Mar 10, 2006

  • I selected Venus mostly as a conveniently nearby target that would enable a field test of several technologies such as aerobraking and, yes, long-duration life support that would ultimately be used on the Mars mission.

    Obama Speaks of NASA Being Adrift - NASA Watch

  • I personally like the idea of the govt focusing its limited resources on pushing the key leveraging technologies that will enable long-term, far-ranging operations in space: nuclear propulsion & power, aerobraking, ISRU, tethers, closed-loop ECLSS, etc.

    Leroy Chiao Seeks Your Input - NASA Watch

  • (The architecture should ultimately involve the establishment of fuel depots, aerobraking, tethers, and reusable ascent/entry vehicles both at Earth and at the Moon);

    Why Some Say the Moon? - NASA Watch

  • If your astronaut needs immediate attention while aerobraking there is no chance he/she will survive, unless you have some sort of an escape pod.

    Trying To Spin The Facts - NASA Watch

  • "If your astronaut needs immediate attention while aerobraking there is no chance he/she will survive, unless you have some sort of an escape pod."

    Trying To Spin The Facts - NASA Watch

  • For unmanned spacecraft you can use both aerobraking and propellant while with manned spacecraft you can use propellant.

    Trying To Spin The Facts - NASA Watch

  • I said that "For unmanned spacecraft you can use both aerobraking and propellant while with manned spacecraft you can use propellant".

    Trying To Spin The Facts - NASA Watch

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