Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • verb To make aesthetic; to show something at its best, most pleasing or most artistic.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • But where O'Connor subjects her characters' actions to a rigorous moral investigation, Means tends either to pull back to a remote, bird's-eye view a favourite trope is to lay out a sort of mini-encyclopedia of possible interpretations of the event in question, as offered by professors, news commentators, and so on or, more commonly, to aestheticise it.

    The Spot by David Means – review

  • But though you are tired and footsore, you are ready to aestheticise till the

    Confessions of a Young Man

  • But you can't help wondering if this is evasive - especially as the novel itself underscores the danger of using geometry to aestheticise war.

    Telegraph.co.uk - Telegraph online, Daily Telegraph and Sunday Telegraph

  • Trying to aestheticise climate change only serves to turn it into a marketable commodity; and -- as a consequence -- you will devalue a genuinely important and pressing issue, as well as turning people against the need for action ( "it's a big money making con", etc.).

    The Guardian World News

  • Luckily, Aronofsky's compassion is unwavering; he doesn't aestheticise his subject's suffering, the way Martin Scorsese did in

    Expecting Rain

  • Luckily, Aronofsky's compassion is unwavering; he doesn't aestheticise his subject's suffering, the way Martin Scorsese did in

    Expecting Rain

  • Luckily, Aronofsky's compassion is unwavering; he doesn't aestheticise his subject's suffering, the way Martin Scorsese did in

    New Statesman

  • Luckily, Aronofsky's compassion is unwavering; he doesn't aestheticise his subject's suffering, the way Martin Scorsese did in

    Expecting Rain

  • Luckily, Aronofsky's compassion is unwavering; he doesn't aestheticise his subject's suffering, the way Martin Scorsese did in

    Expecting Rain

  • Luckily, Aronofsky's compassion is unwavering; he doesn't aestheticise his subject's suffering, the way Martin Scorsese did in

    Expecting Rain

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