Definitions

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun The roping on the after edge of a fore-and-aft sail. The roping on the forward edge is called by American seamen the luff and by English seamen the forward leech. See leech.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • I regret omitting to obtain the length of the after-leech of the mainsail, and of the head of the jib; but I think the print, which I believe to be very accurate, would justify me in concluding that the former is about 110 feet and the latter about 120 feet.

    Lands of the Slave and the Free Cuba, the United States, and Canada

  • But the darkness favored, and he heard no more of it — perhaps because he worked into the wind closer by a point, and held on his way with a shaking after-leech.

    Chapter XVIII

  • But the darkness favored, and he heard no more of it — perhaps because he worked into the wind closer by a point, and held on his way with a rebellious shaking after-leech.

    The Cruise of the "Dazzler"

  • From above came the slapping of canvas and the quivering rat-tat-tat of the after-leech of the loosely stretched foresail.

    The Lost Poacher

  • But the darkness favored, and he heard no more of it -- perhaps because he worked into the wind closer by a point, and held on his way with a shaking after-leech.

    The Cruise of the Dazzler

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