Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • noun The structure of an aircraft, such as an airplane, helicopter, or rocket, exclusive of its engine.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun the framework and covering of an airplane or rocket (excluding the engines).

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun The main body and structure of an aircraft (without the powerplant).

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun the framework and covering of an airplane or rocket (excluding the engines)

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

air +‎ frame

Examples

  • Boeing says it purchased 65 percent of the 787 airframe, which is comparable to the 777.

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  • Boeing says it purchased 65 percent of the 787 airframe, which is comparable to the 777.

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  • Boeing says it purchased 65 percent of the 787 airframe, which is comparable to the 777.

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  • The airframe is the first to be built under an agreement between Sikorsky and Changhe Aircraft.

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  • The airframe is the first to be built under an agreement between Sikorsky and Changhe Aircraft.

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  • The airframe is a "flying - wing" blimp, similar to the w w w. d y n a l i f t e r. c o m cargo blimp, only much much smaller.

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  • The airframe is the first to be built under an agreement between Sikorsky and Changhe Aircraft.

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  • The A330 airframe is based on the A300 airframe, which is older than when the B767 airframe was initially designed.

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  • It had a different kind of airframe, to absorb energy and make sudden impacts easier to survive — part of a NASA project to see whether the shock of a plane's slamming into a bank of trees or a wall could be directed away from the passengers, as in a modern car.

    Freedom of the Skies

  • It had a different kind of airframe, to absorb energy and make sudden impacts easier to survive — part of a NASA project to see whether the shock of a plane's slamming into a bank of trees or a wall could be directed away from the passengers, as in a modern car.

    Freedom of the Skies

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