Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • noun The speed, especially of an aircraft, relative to the air.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun aviation The speed of an aircraft relative to the air through which it is flying.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun the speed of an aircraft relative to the air in which it is flying

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • LT Malcolm A. "Art" Avore was preparing to launch from the ORISKANY on an operational mission when he failed to gain airspeed after the catapult launch and ditched in the South China Sea off the coast of South Vietnam.

    Avore, Malcolm A. "Art"

  • At 800 hours that day, the aircraft was catapult launched for an operational flight, but did not maintain airspeed and crashed near the ship.

    Grayson, William R.

  • At 800 hours that day, the aircraft was catapult launched for an operational flight, but did not maintain airspeed and crashed near the ship.

    Krech, Melvin T.

  • "I don't have any more indications," one of the pilots said, perhaps referring to airspeed but possibly something else.

    Crash Report Shows Confused Cockpit

  • EAS is defined as the airspeed at sea level which produces the same dynamic pressure acting on the airframe as the true airspeed at high altitudes. [

    9/11: Speeds Reported For World Trade Center Attack Aircraft Analyzed

  • The flight data recorder records aircraft performance details such as airspeed and altitude.

    chicagotribune.com -

  • Specially trained personnel wash the airplanes, taking great care to make sure water does not enter places where it could cause problems such as airspeed or altitude sensing ports.

    USATODAY.com News

  • The flight data recorder records aircraft performance details such as airspeed and altitude.

    chicagotribune.com -

  • m/s ( "airspeed" = airplane's speed through the surrounding air) with her airplane pointed 67.0 degrees east of north.

    Yahoo! Answers: Latest Questions

  • "Our experimental aircraft customers are able to customize their avionics data display to their preference, and they expect their data to be accurate, such as airspeed indication.

    Aero-News Network

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