Definitions

from The Century Dictionary.

  • Without aisles.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • adjective Without an aisle.

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

aisle +‎ -less

Examples

  • Although there was a wide variety — and no architectural plan was imposed upon them as it was among the Cistercians — the women's churches were either aisleless hall churches in the shape of a rectangle as at Töss, Au bei Stein, and St. Katharinenthal, or a usually aisleless nave with a Germanic Langchor, as at Klingenthal, Oetenbach, and Unterlinden.

    Sensual Encounters: Monastic Women and Spirituality in Medieval Germany

  • The women's churches tended to be aisleless but divided in some manner.

    Sensual Encounters: Monastic Women and Spirituality in Medieval Germany

  • The Langchor was an elongated, narrow choir, usually aisleless, that extended about five bays, although in some case it could be up to seven bays.

    Sensual Encounters: Monastic Women and Spirituality in Medieval Germany

  • (Mid-Lothian) has been rebuilt, with the exception of the S. aisle or chapel, and the structure has originally been a Norman one, with aisleless nave, choir, and round E. apse.

    Scottish Cathedrals and Abbeys

  • The abbey church consisted of a choir of three bays, with side aisles and an aisleless presbytery; a nave of nine bays, with aisles and north and south transepts with eastern aisles; two western towers and one large central tower.

    Scottish Cathedrals and Abbeys

  • The choir is aisleless, consisting of three bays; the nave had three bays with a window in each, and aisle on S. side.

    Scottish Cathedrals and Abbeys

  • S. transepts, a W. tower, and aisleless choir of three bays with E. apse.

    Scottish Cathedrals and Abbeys

  • _Muthill Church_ (Perthshire), has Norman tower at the west end, with nave having north and south aisles and an aisleless choir.

    Scottish Cathedrals and Abbeys

  • To the east of the transept is a choir of two bays, with aisles, and beyond which is an aisleless presbytery.

    Scottish Cathedrals and Abbeys

  • Besides the Church of St. Regulus, there are still to be seen the ruins of the great Cathedral of St. Andrews, which consisted of a short aisleless presbytery, and choir of five bays with side aisles, with an eastern chapel in each aisle; north and south transepts, each of three bays with eastern aisles; nave of twelve bays with north and south aisles, and a large central tower over the crossing.

    Scottish Cathedrals and Abbeys

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