Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • adjective of, or relating to, akrasia

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Anguslander writes, “There are all sorts of ways you can figure out (a) whether preventing someone from doing behavior B is likely to make them better off and (b) whether someone is doing B because he is akratic or otherwise irrational.”

    The Volokh Conspiracy » Pitfalls of Paternalism

  • There are all sorts of ways you can figure out (a) whether preventing someone from doing behavior B is likely to make them better off and (b) whether someone is doing B because he is akratic or otherwise irrational.

    The Volokh Conspiracy » Pitfalls of Paternalism

  • Davidson, as we saw, viewed akratic action as possible, but irrational.

    Weakness of Will

  • Some tack more to the internalist side, wishing to preserve a strong internal connection between evaluation and action even at the risk of denying or seeming to deny the possibility of akratic action (or at least some understandings of it).

    Weakness of Will

  • We can also re-examine the issue of the rationality of akrasia in light of this analysis of weakness of will; for we can distinguish between akratic and non-akratic cases of the latter.

    Weakness of Will

  • The irrationality which is held necessarily to attach to akratic action derives from the discrepancy between what the agent judges to be the best (or better) thing to do, and what she does.

    Weakness of Will

  • But traditionalists may say that is beside the point: however well things turn out, the practical thinking of the akratic agent still exhibits a procedural defect.

    Weakness of Will

  • Even if akratic action is possible and indeed actual, it remains a puzzling, marginal, somehow defective instance of agency, one that we rightly find not fully intelligible.

    Weakness of Will

  • These dissenters stress the substantive merits of the course of action the akratic agent follows.

    Weakness of Will

  • The akratic says, at the time of action, that he ought not to indulge in this particular pleasure at this time.

    Aristotle's Ethics

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