Definitions

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun A position to which troops are to repair in case of an alarm.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Brooklyn Church was to be the alarm-post, where the covering party was to concentrate in case the enemy attacked during the night.

    The Campaign of 1776 around New York and Brooklyn

  • Provisions also were to be supplied to each alarm-post "in case of siege," and the water-casks kept constantly full of fresh water.

    The Campaign of 1776 around New York and Brooklyn

  • To call it an _alarm-post_ would not have been so convenient; for, people not endued with Scotch

    Highways and Byways in Surrey

  • At the alarm-post next morning the men were in high spirits again.

    Fort Amity

  • All that night the garrison had slept by their arms, until with the first streak of day the drums called them out to their alarm-post.

    Fort Amity

  • The men stamped their feet on the frozen road as we hurried to the alarm-post, and there I walked into a crowd of dark figures which closed around me at once.

    The Adventures of Harry Revel

  • Shops were closed, and men in blouses were beginning to assemble in knots -- here and there the red-cap loomed ominously in the far end of narrow alleys, and in the wider streets the only passengers either seemed in haste like himself, or else were National Guards hurrying to their alarm-post.

    Dynevor Terrace: or, the clue of life — Volume 1

  • Dalkeith, which was their alarm-post, about one o'clock on the day succeeding the first signal, with men and horses in good order, though the roads were in a bad state, and many of the troopers must have ridden forty or fifty miles without drawing bridle.

    The Antiquary

  • Selkirkshire Yeomanry made a remarkable march, for although some of the individuals lived at twenty and thirty miles 'distance from the place where they mustered, they were nevertheless embodied and in order in so short a period, that they were at Dalkeith, which was their alarm-post, about one o'clock on the day succeeding the first signal, with men and horses in good order, though the roads were in a bad state, and many of the troopers must have ridden forty or fifty miles without drawing bridle.

    The Antiquary — Complete

  • Selkirkshire Yeomanry made a remarkable march, for although some of the individuals lived at twenty and thirty miles 'distance from the place where they mustered, they were nevertheless embodied and in order in so short a period, that they were at Dalkeith, which was their alarm-post, about one o'clock on the day succeeding the first signal, with men and horses in good order, though the roads were in a bad state, and many of the troopers must have ridden forty or fifty miles without drawing bridle.

    The Antiquary — Volume 02

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