Definitions

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun etc. See alkali, etc.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Tedmor or Palmyra, bring to Aleppo once or twice every year alcali, which they collect in the desert.

    Travels in Nubia

  • Table III: Density and concentration in free alcali of caustic soda (NaOH) and potassium (KOH) solutions

    Chapter 4

  • Ah! madam, said I to my wife, if ever I eat of garlic ragoo again, I solemnly swear to wash my hands an hundred and twenty times with the herb alcali, with the ashes of the same plant, and with soap.

    The Arabian Nights Entertainments - Volume 01

  • It's a little child ez uster crawl in and out the tail-board of a Mizzouri wagon on the alcali pizoned plains, where there wasn't another bit of God's mercy on yearth to be seen for miles and miles.

    By Shore and Sedge

  • Whence it would appear, that as by the repeated explosions of the two electric ethers in the conducting water, both oxygen and hydrogen are liberated; the oxygen erodes the zinc plates, and thus increases the Galvanic shock by liberating their combined electric ethers: and that this erosion is much increased by a mixture either of acid or of volatile alcali with the water.

    Note XII

  • May 1801, asserts, that when the intervening cloths or papers are moistened with pure alcali, as a solution of pure ammonia, the effect is greater than by any other material.

    Note XII

  • To further elucidate these various attractions, if the patient reader be not already tired, he will please to attend to the following experiment: let a bit of sponge suspended on a silk line be moistened with a solution of pure alcali, and another similar piece of sponge be moistened with

    Note XII

  • But when an acid is mixed with a pure alcali a combination is produced, and the mixture is said to become neutral, as it does not possess the chemical properties which either of the two ingredients possessed in their separate state, and is therefore similar to neither of them.

    The Temple of Nature; or, the Origin of Society A Poem, with Philosophical Notes

  • No. 36, for May 1801, asserts, that when the intervening cloths or papers are moistened with pure alcali, as a solution of pure ammonia, the effect is greater than by any other material.

    The Temple of Nature; or, the Origin of Society A Poem, with Philosophical Notes

  • Whence it would appear, that as by the repeated explosions of the two electric ethers in the conducting water, both oxygen and hydrogen are liberated; the oxygen erodes the zinc plates, and thus increases the Galvanic shock by liberating their combined electric ethers: and that this erosion is much increased by a mixture either of acid or of volatile alcali with the water.

    The Temple of Nature; or, the Origin of Society A Poem, with Philosophical Notes

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