Definitions

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun A genus of hardy perennial herbs of the family Rosaceæ, allied to Sanguisorba.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun Any of the genus Alchemilla of herbaceous perennial plants.

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From the genus name.

Examples

  • I’ve tried every kind of alchemilla, but they just disappear here.

    New Design-Daylily Hill Edge « Fairegarden

  • At sunrise after humid nights, the serrated rims of lady's mantle leaves are fringed with sparkling water droplets, once believed by alchemists to be essential for converting base metals into silver the Latin name of this plant, alchemilla, means "little alchemist".

    Make hay meadow photos while the sun shines | Phil Gates

  • I moved most of mine to a more-open area after it began to worm its way into nearby foamflowers (tiarella) and lady's mantle (alchemilla).

    Garden Thugs

  • I moved most of mine to a more-open area after it began to worm its way into nearby foamflowers (tiarella) and lady's mantle (alchemilla).

    Garden Thugs

  • I moved most of mine to a more-open area after it began to worm its way into nearby foamflowers (tiarella) and lady's mantle (alchemilla).

    Garden Thugs

  • I moved most of mine to a more-open area after it began to worm its way into nearby foamflowers (tiarella) and lady's mantle (alchemilla).

    Garden Thugs

  • Our driveway would become overrun with alchemilla, which roots itself right in there, along with columbine.

    What Will Happen To The Garden? « Fairegarden

  • I've already planted some alchemilla mollis also known more poetically as Lady's Mantle, four small plants that were struggling in the back of our apartment building and will hopefully do better in the new garden.

    Archive 2009-08-01

  • I picked up two dozen alchemilla for 30 cents each at my local nursery a few weeks ago.

    Did You Really Think I Bought All Of These Plants? « Fairegarden

  • The botanical name, alchemilla, is derived from the word alchemy, because the herbs in this family are believed to bring about miraculous cures.

    Earl Mindell’s New Herb Bible

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